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Hypocrisy At The Heart Of The Left

in Politics by
hypocrisy

There exists no dearth of outrage on the Left toward the perceived hypocrisy of President Donald Trump and the Republican Party at large. Mr. Trump, they remind us, was elected due to a number of campaign promises, not least of them was the pledge to “drain the swamp”, a not-so-thinly-veiled allusion to the pervasive influence of lobbyists and career politicians infesting the halls of power in Washington, D.C. Mr. Trump’s cabinet nominees, particularly Steve Mnuchin and Betsy DeVos, are stark examples in the minds of leftists that our president has broken his word. The Left is correct, from time to time, when they call out the hypocrisy of the Right. We cannot on one hand claim to be for limited government and then on the other demand Big Brother interfere in a woman’s right to choose to exterminate her young. We cannot claim to be for free markets while also bending to the will of big business lobbies that demand unfair tax breaks and access to our regulatory apparatus…

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Strange Women Lying In Ponds Distributing Swords Is The Only Basis For a Form Of Government

in History/Philosophy by

Kingdom of Kent, Saxon England, 932 – Newly anointed King Arthur tours his realm seeking knights for the round table at Camelot. He bore with him the decree of none other than God Himself, ordained by Heaven to rule the Angles and Saxons. Alas, for yon head-choppy days of yore were dark times for God’s anointed to the Throne of England. For there were those who questioned the legitimacy of his claim to the Crown. Stopping to confer with two lowly peasants in a marsh in the wilderness west of Canterbury, he demanded fealty. The peasant demanded by what right he claimed to be their king, since they didn’t vote for him. King Arthur replied that the Lady of the Lake had bestowed upon him the great Sword Excalibur. “Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords? That’s no basis for a form of government!” And after explaining that they would not recognize a government that did not rule by the people for the good of the community, they went…

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A Letter To The Government

in Economics/Politics by

Dear Government, As tax season comes to a close, the existing arrangement between you and I has recently been at the forefront of my mind. Looking back over my year’s W2’s, and contemplating the amount of money you’ve taken from me, I couldn’t help but write to express my displeasure with our situation and to insist upon an alternative. The current arrangement is such that you receive somewhere in the neighborhood of 35-40% of all my income. The services, and the quality thereof, which are provided in return are not adequate to meet my value demands based upon what I could pay for similar services on the market. I require a change to this arrangement. I will hereby be opting out of all of your services. You can cross me off your list of future Social Security recipients. Don’t ever worry about me asking for medicare, medicaid, food stamps, section 8, cell phones, unemployment assistance, police, fire protection, or anything else that you seek to provide. I will make…

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Kingsmen – End Sovereign Immunity!

in Philosophy/Politics by

The doctrine of sovereign immunity derives from the English notion that “the king can do no wrong” and hence cannot be sued without his consent. The purpose of this doctrine was, in England, from at least the Middle Ages until eighteenth century, to bar certain lawsuits against the monarch and his or her ministers and servants. With the rise of the English Parliament after the death of Elizabeth I, government officers and politicians sought to gain the power of immunity that the monarch and his or her agents had enjoyed. In practice, however, English subjects were not totally deprived of remedies against the monarch or the government. The doctrine of sovereign immunity was not an absolute prohibition on actions against the crown or against other branches of government;[1] subjects could avail themselves of petitions of right or writs of mandamus, for instance, and monarchs fearful of losing the support of the people would often consent to be sued. It was not until the monarchy had been demonstrably weakened that…

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