Big League Opinion!

Is Russia The Real Enemy Of The American People?

in World by

Why the demonization of Putin by Glenn Beck and other western media?  First off, let me just say that I enjoy watching many programs on the Blaze, but on Russia, Glenn is listening to the wrong people.   Glenn Beck has recently put out a one sided three part series ominously called, “The Red Storm” which caricatures Russia as an end times force of the “anti-christ” focused on destroying the west.  While the background history on the split between the Orthodox east and Catholic west was well done, the modern analysis falls apart and is easily refuted with just a cursory review of online sources.  Thank God for the internet and the ability to sift through the spin.  So why are western media  trying to turn Russia into the next Bogeyman? Recall that the vassal western media portrayed everything the buffoon Boris Yeltsin did as a move away from communism and towards democracy, but everything Putin has done is “bad and sinister”.  Glenn follows in this vein with his series and seems…

Keep Reading

Hayek, Statistics, And Trade-Cycle Theory

in Economics by

Austrian economics is often caricatured and criticized because of its approach, or deliberate lack of an approach, to mathematical models, multivariable calculus, and econometrics. Attacks are leveled against Austrians such as Mises, Rothbard, and Kirzner for their failure or refusal to avail themselves of applied empirical research in their scholarship. The Austrian methodology most frequently targeted is praxeology. It is not the purpose of this short article to refute these attacks or to explore their errors and merits. That has been done ably by others (see, for example, the series of debate-essays available here, here, here, and here). Nor does this article attempt to stand up for the deductive reasoning of praxeology or to defend its claims about a priori truths, a task better suited for a lengthy work of scholarship, not a short article. This piece instead asks one simple question: does Hayek’s early work on trade-cycle theory complicate stereotypes about the methods of Austrian economics or clarify the manner in which Austrians can and do approach economic…

Keep Reading

“Tax Hike” Mike Huckabee: Too Liberal For Conservatives?

in Politics by

The 2015 political season kicked off with a bombshell hitting the 2016 GOP Primary field, with former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee announcing that he would be leaving his Fox News program to explore a run for president. This announcement comes at a time when the GOP primary field is as convoluted as ever, and many conservatives are praying for an alternative to establishment Republican Jeb Bush, who has been narrowly leading the field in most recent national polling. That being said, conservatives who have come to love Huckabee’s likable posture on television and identify with him over years of watching him on Fox News (an advantage that will certainly help him in his run) may be forgetting a disturbing pattern of liberal positions he took, new taxes he imposed and big spending bills that he signed into law as governor. Considering the fact that Huckabee has not run since 2008, a time when the GOP was far less conservative than it is today, there is reason to believe that…

Keep Reading

You Are Perfectly Free To Say Nice Things

in Philosophy/Politics by

Continuing in its fifth year, the Broadsides series published by Encounter Books consists of paperback pamphlets modeled on 18th-century political pamphlets such as The Federalist Papers and Thomas Paine’s Common Sense. Short and accessible, polemical and jargon-free, speedily produced and mass-marketed, these pamphlets examine any number of policy issues from immigration and climate change to gun control and Obamacare. Published this year, the 39th book in the series is Greg Lukianoff’s Freedom From Speech, a vigorous and cogent refutation of the increasingly popular notion that people have a right not to be offended. Lukianoff is an attorney and the president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving civil liberties in academia. His first book, Unlearning Liberty, earned high acclaim from pundits and reviewers with diverse political leanings. Who gets to decide what is offensive and what isn’t? How do we determine who is worthy of such power? “It seems as if every day brings a new controversy regarding the purportedly offensive…

Keep Reading

The Betrayal Of The American Right

in Politics by

Published in 1979, the famous free-market economist Murray Rothbard wrote this masterpiece on how the Republican Party lost its way, betraying principle. In order to revive the principles of limited government and a non-aggressive foreign policy, conservatives such as Senator Taft, Goldwater, and President Reagan led coalitions against the establishment. Now, the Tea Party attempts to do the same with a coalition among Conservatives, Constitutionalists, and Libertarians. However, we have consistently failed to garner solidarity which leads another victory for the status quo. Congressman John Boehner was easily elected again even after suffering the biggest battle for Speaker of the House in the past 100 years. Here we stand, again with another betrayal. Why? For what reason? Even after many Congressmen openly campaigned and said they would oppose Boehner, garnering grassroots support, they still ended up betraying their constituents today. Even after many Congressmen had praiseworthy voting records last session, taking more conservative votes than the majority of the Liberty Caucus, they ended up voting for Speaker Boehner. Here is…

Keep Reading

America Isn’t Strong Enough For Torture

in Politics by

Torture. Just hearing that word is enough to give one pause. It’s a bit of a superlative for pain – a word reserved for those times when “hurt”, “suffering,” and “agony” just don’t cover it. The word carries with it images of gory slasher films and whispered stories from Soviet gulags. It’s a vestige of darker times, undeserving of any place in the greatest nation in the history of the world. It’s something that is at least as universally-condemned as child molestation and cold-blooded murder. Or was, until a few weeks ago. With the release of classified CIA documents detailing “enhanced interrogation techniques” used by American operatives in the so-called War on Terror, a new debate has been sparked. As with every other issue that hits the headlines these days, most folks formed an opinion within milliseconds and took to social media to express it faster than you can say “Guantanamo”. As I read the reports and articles swirling around the netscape, I was tempted to do the same.…

Keep Reading

Getting Conned By CONs

in Economics/Politics by

In the healthcare industry, a certificate of need, also known by the acronym CON, is an anticompetitive licensing restriction allegedly designed to promote fair competition by requiring hospitals to demonstrate the need for certain projects and services in order to receive governmental permission for those projects and services. Under a CON scheme, a hospital–-let’s call it Hospital X–-that wishes to expand its facilities applies to a state health planning agency for a CON. Nearby hospitals–perhaps Hospital X’s competitors, Hospital Y and Hospital Z–may oppose Hospital X’s CON application. An administrative law judge (ALJ) reviews Hospital X’s CON application and supporting evidence, holds a hearing on the matter, evaluates the parties and witnesses, and determines whether Hospital X has met the statutory criteria for the issuance of a CON. These criteria differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The ALJ’s decision may then be appealed to some higher body within the state health-planning agency. That body’s decision may in turn be appealed to a court of first instance or a trial court…

Keep Reading

Trey Gowdy Grills Jonathan Gruber: “Is Not Being A Politician Your Defense?”

in Politics by

Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) made MIT economist Jonathan Gruber squirm in his seat during the House Oversight hearing as he questioned him about the a series of statements he made about the tactics used to sell ObamaCare to the public.     Gowdy forced Gruber to repeat over and over again his humiliating, rehearsed talking points – that he was being “glib” and trying to make himself “look smarter” when he made all those statements about deceiving the American voters. “What did you mean when you said, we proposed it and it passed because the American people were too stupid to understand the difference?” Gowdy asked? “When I said that, I was at an economic conference, being glib, and quite frankly trying to make myself seem smart by insulting others,” Gruber replied. He would give that same basic answer to explain his other inconvenient statements about ObamaCare. Gruber also noted repeatedly that he’s not an expert on politics to explain away his past statements, but Gowdy was having none…

Keep Reading

End The Wrong-Headed War On Drugs

in Politics by

The great debate on the effectiveness of the War on Drugs has emerged and caused tremendous angst to big government social conservatives. We are told by authorities that violent crime, rape, and murder will become the norm if marijuana is legalized. While libertarians question the effectiveness of spending $45,000 a year to put a non-violent drug offender behind bars for 5-20 years. That’s right. The War on Drugs requires us to pay salaries, benefits and pensions to law enforcement, the prison system, the judiciary, and myriad other personnel. It’s cheaper to send these drug offenders to Harvard. Yet libertarians are misguided if we think society will tolerate irresponsible behavior. There are two sides to freedom. One is our right to privacy, the other is personal responsibility. It is interesting to note that many conservative icons associated with morality and civic virtue have called for the decriminalization or the complete legality of smoking marijuana. They include Sarah Palin, who says, “What people do in the privacy of their own living…

Keep Reading

The Real Story Behind The Riots, Legalized Plunder

in Politics by

Just last month my friend and photo radar expert Shawn Dow told me that the real reason behind the police protests in Ferguson was the automatic ticketing photo radar machines that had been put in place by local governments to raise revenue.  This has caused incredible harm on the poor in the community and frustration towards their police force which was becoming increasingly more militarized and disconnected from the public because of poor decisions made by the local politicians.  Upon further investigation the facts prove this to be the case. This anger at camera speeding tickets, not an apparently justified police shooting, was the long simmering motivation behind the riots.  Michael Brown was just the poor excuse to vent frustrations at the system that is shaking them down.  Unjust laws meant to fleece the public create resentment and disrespect for the law and those who enforce them.  It has been shown that these machines do not increase safety and in fact cause accidents to spike.  Missouri State representative  Courtney Curtis stated…

Keep Reading

Just Stop It

in World by

“We just marched in, we can just march out.” Those were the words of Congressman Ron Paul during a debate while he was running for President in 2012. They were in response to a question of Paul’s desired foreign policy of non-interventionism as well as his call for an immediate and total withdrawal from Iraq and Afghanistan. “How would he accomplish this goal?” he was asked. The sentiment of his response was that it seemed quite simple for the US to just invade, so it would be equally simple for the US to leave. The CIA described the negative backlash US foreign policy in the Middle East would generate as ‘blowback.’ After more than half a century of intervention and interference in the affairs of the countries of that region, it is no wonder that hatred of US imperialism has developed and militant groups have formed to fight against what they view as an occupation of their homelands. Blowback has come to rear it’s ugly head on far too…

Keep Reading

Dear Oatmeal, Net Neutrality Just Isn’t Fair

in Economics/Politics by

Dear Oatmeal, As I was scrolling through my social media news feed yesterday, I couldn’t help but notice a letter you wrote to Texas Senator Ted Cruz. Your letter, in response to Mr. Cruz referring to Net Neutrality as “Obamacare for the Internet”, portended to explain to the Senator just how Net Neutrality works. I am not Ted Cruz, but I do happen to write for a couple of reputable online publications and put a considerable amount of thought into current events and policy issues. As I read your letter, two concerns formed in my mind: 1) I’m not sure you’ve really thought through the ramifications of the Net Neutrality standards that you’re attempting to justify. 2) I’m also not sure you have even a cursory understanding of some really important concepts surrounding the whole debate – free association, free enterprise, and heck, even freedom itself. So in the spirit of cooperation and mutual understanding (and because I consider myself a good sport), I’d like to help you out with an explanation of these concepts. Imagine that you good folks at The…

Keep Reading

The Absurd Attack On Rand Paul Via Association With Judge Napolitano

in Politics by

The leftist website Media Matters has published a hit piece on Kentucky GOP Senator Rand Paul. In the article they attempt to smear Senator Paul by exposing his relationship with Fox News Contributor and former New Jersey Superior Court Judge Andrew Napolitano. Senator Paul wrote the foreword for Judge Napolitano’s new book, Suicide Pact: The Radical Expansion of Presidential Powers and the Assault on Civil Liberties. Media Matters claims that Napolitano is dangerous because he is a “9/11 Truther” and Confederate apologist. By smearing Napolitano, they’re trying to tarnish Paul. But there is one problem: the claims against Napolitano are mostly nonsense.     Here at Lions of Liberty we haven’t held back from criticizing Senator Paul when he has strayed from libertarian principles, which he does with increasing frequency. There’s nothing wrong with criticizing a politician, but it should be done based on their policy and character, not by manufacturing controversies. Let’s review the claims against Napolitano and by association Paul, which links them both to the 9-11 Truther movement because…

Keep Reading

Why The Fair Tax Beats The Tar Out Of The Income Tax

in Economics/Politics by

If you haven’t seen “UnFair the  Movie”, I highly recommend getting the DVD.  John Sullivan, the same producer of “2016: Obama’s America” and “Expelled:  No Intelligence Allowed”,  took the unfair title from the language of the left.  Polling shows that Americans respond very favorably to the term unfair.  UnFair the movie was released “Michael Moore” style with a  great  grass roots promotion of this documentary which focuses on  the abuses of the IRS. What we have here is an IRS which is not about revenue but  about intimidating and harrassing people and is all powerful controlling our politics, faith and the economy.  The current system is not just unfair,  it’s immoral.  It  violates at least four areas of the Constitution.  First  amendment religious and political expression is violated by the “Johnson Amendment” which seeks to regulate churches and 501c organizations via their tax exemption status.   The fourth amendment guarantees the right to privacy- yet we have a totalitarian IRS which says you have 2 weeks to give us all of…

Keep Reading

Midterm Election Messaging Towards Millennials Turns Shirtless

in Politics by

The mid-term elections are less than a week away, and as the big day draws closer, the means employed to attract the youth to the polls are garnering extreme controversy. This was first seen with the release of the College Republican National Committee’s “Say Yes to the Candidate” ads, which were widely derided by the liberal media as sexist. It has since then, evolved from music videos containing popular celebrities to physically trying to get millennials to the polls. The most outrageous case of this attempt is set to take place at North Carolina State University this Election Day, thanks to Cosmopolitan Magazine. The #CosmoVotes Party Bus is part of a recent contest by the magazine, aiming to increase youth participation in the “party of the year” by providing transportation to and from this polls this coming TuesdayThe fascinating thing about the bus is it is not just a simple shuttle. The Cosmo Party bus will contain not only your typical free handouts and food, but an entourage of…

Keep Reading

Voting Republican Advances The Liberty Movement Better Than Voting Libertarian

in Politics by

You only have one vote every two years.  A liberty-leaning voter only has two options. Which party in 2014 would best advance a self-governing society? Would voting and supporting Libertarian candidates, at the expense of Constitutional and Libertarian-leaning Republicans, help advance a minimal state more efficiently? Has it ever even been successful? Did former Congressman Ron Paul stick with the Libertarian Party because it achieved the goals of  producing a limited government? Last year, former Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, narrowly lost the governor’s race in Virginia. The Libertarian candidate, Robert Sarvis, who is now running for Senate gained 6.6% of the vote even after being criticized by Ron Paul for supporting more taxes. Sarvis had his liberty credentials tested on multiple occasions and ultimately, at best, was a small government social liberal.  Meanwhile, Ken, although not claiming to be a Libertarian, still did a decent job at advancing a variety of our goals. On fiscal issues, Ken leaned closer to the Austrian School than Sarvis by far. If the…

Keep Reading

Rand Paul Boosts GOP Senate Candidates

in Politics by

Rand Paul’s leadership political action committee, RAND PAC, is launching ad buys on behalf of several Republican Senate candidates in tight races. RAND PAC had $242,000 cash on hand as of October 15, and has raised an additional $300,000 from a Ron Paul-style moneybomb over the last two weeks. The six-figure broadcast, cable, and online ad buys will primarily target Kansas, where incumbent Republican Pat Roberts is facing an unexpectedly tight contest against independent Greg Orman. The ads focus on the topic of foreign aid, with Paul lauding Roberts for opposing foreign aid to countries hostile to the United States. Furthermore, RAND PAC is spending $16,000 apiece in Kentucky, Iowa ,New Hampshire, and North Carolina to support other Republican Senate candidates in competitive races. Many other potential presidential contenders, such as Ted Cruz and Chris Christie, have been stumping around the country with Republican candidates this year. However, Paul goes a step further, digging into his own coffers in a largely symbolic yet meaningful gesture of support. The ad buys…

Keep Reading

“War On Women” Charge Draws Laughs, Ridicule From Debate Crowd

in Politics by

This past Thursday, I had the privilege of attending the New York 23rd Congressional District debate, featuring Republican incumbent Tom Reed and his challenger, Democrat Martha Robertson. I arrived to the debate an hour prior at the request of my county GOP chair, and was surprised to arrive at an absolute spectacle. Several hundred supporters had already descended upon the arena, both sides being very well represented, though the Republican incumbent had a clear edge in numbers. As we stood in the hallway a group of snide looking college liberals stood to the side, chanting “a vote for Reed is a vote for greed”. The majority Reed crowd immediately responded by chanting “Tom Reed! Tom Reed!”, setting off a frenzy and prompting one of the organizers to call for a calm entrance into the arena. It turned out that it was a good thing for me to have gotten there so early, because the room to accommodate audience members was maybe 300 people large, and well over half of those…

Keep Reading

Ben Carson: Counterfeit Conservative

in Politics by

If you are a member of the conservative movement who has been paying even a modicum of attention, you have no doubt noticed the rise of the “Draft Ben Carson for President” movement. The group made their first major statement by coming in 3rd place in the CPAC 2014 straw poll, just 2 points behind the 2nd place finisher, Texas senator Ted Cruz. Carson beat out well organized, well known names such as Chris Christie, Paul Ryan, Rick Santorum and Marco Rubio for the third place finish. Since that point, Carson and his loyal group of followers have begun to create quite a wave within our movement, winning straw polls (on the FreedomWorks Online Straw Poll he is currently in 1st place) and raising millions of dollars in the process. Anybody who listens to Sean Hannity has undoubtedly heard the “Run, Ben, Run!” commercials on his radio show, and anybody who goes on comment threads online cannot possibly deny Carson’s reach and influence. Despite all of this excitement around…

Keep Reading

A Time For War: How Foreign Policy Can Make Or Break The Liberty Movement

in World by

The Middle East is in flames again, and for once, Liberty people seem unsure what to think about it.  For years our only rallying cry was “no more nation-building – bring the troops home!” And for a while, that was enough.  Our foreign policy ideals were so diametrically opposed to those in play for the last few administrations, we didn’t need to nail down all the details of our ideology.  Mere assertion sufficed. But the situation in Iraq has brought the Liberty Movement to a crossroads. On one side, Ron Paul’s steady non-interventionism is what first drew many people to the Movement, and the case could even be made that these foreign-policy-first libertarians form the core of the Liberty Movement.  These folks steadfastly believe that the United States should bring all military forces home and leave the world to its own devices, relying on free trade and free association to govern international affairs.  But this group has fallen strangely silent in the wake of all the images coming out…

Keep Reading

Listen Or Ignore The Voices?

in Politics by

In our daily lives, we hear thousands of voices. They come from TV, the internet, our family, our friends, our churches, and every other place where we have interaction with others. Everyone has their opinion on how we should think or what we should believe. Who do we listen to? You may come across a few different types of people in your day to day interactions. There are those who basically parrot whatever their preferred source for opinion is. Whether they get their opinion from Bill O’Reilly, John Stewart, or even a good source it is obvious they just repeat what they are told to think without much critical thought. Buzz words are usually a generous portion of their argument, and logical fallacies are contained in their comebacks (for more on logical fallacies click here). Strive to not be one of those people. Spend some time on introspection to determine whether you have any depth or originality to your opinions. Next are the people who watch Fox News and…

Keep Reading

Cruzin For a Bruisin

in Politics/World by

A funny thing happened to Senator Ted Cruz on his way to an “In Defense of Christians” event,  he turned it into a rally for Israel and an attack on Christians who disagree with his narrow views.  When a hit piece on the conference alleged that one of the Lebanese Patriarchs had worked with Hezbollah against ISIS,  according to Reinvented Daddy, the senator decided to deploy his “hate-seeking Cruz missiles” and ditch the group in order to score points with  the Israeli lobby. First of all he showed his Philistine ways by confusing  the purpose of the event and who his audience was and made outrageous allegations towards members of the group.  These Christian leaders are in a life and death struggle with ISIS and didn’t need the senator to pile on top of the most persecuted group in the world, Middle Eastern Christians.  Amazingly the group was able to cobble together the Patriarchs of the Middle East of various squabbling denominations.  What brought them together was a focus…

Keep Reading

I’m a Conservative, And I Care About Income Inequality

in Economics by

“The rich get richer, and the poor get poorer.”   As a young man growing up in a conservative home in the ‘90s, I must have heard this cliché thrown around by liberals a thousand times.  I really never gave it much thought. Even though my family often toed the poverty line, we worked hard to be self-sufficient and never accept government aid.  To me, income inequality was just a talking point used to attack hard-working business people, and a way to prime voters for the goodies the Democrats planned to buy votes with next election cycle: free health care, free education, food stamps, welfare, etc.  Trickle-down economics made sense to me, and I could see how government policies that benefited business would also help the working-class folks who relied on those businesses for jobs, products, and services. But now, four administrations later, I’m starting to see wage and income gaps in a very different way.  A new report is showing that income inequality is accelerating in the US, and that the…

Keep Reading

Bitcoin: Catalyst For Financial Freedom And Responsibility

in Economics by

What is Bitcoin? To some Bitcoin is just another currency or something equivalent of digital gold. I beg to differ. Bitcoin is not just a currency and payment gateway but a social, political and economic game changer. Bitcoin is fueling a movement towards common sense economic principles and most importantly global financial inclusion. In October of 2008, an individual with the pseudonym of Satoshi Nakamoto, published the first white paper on Bitcoin entitled, “Bitcoin: a Peer to Peer Electronic Cash System”. Satoshi highlighted a new technology he was developing as an open source project. What he may not have realized was the extent of the freedom promoting nature of Bitcoin. As a digital payment gateway, Bitcoin is a tool to send money to anyone around the world with internet connection. Bitcoin also has many promising features to promote financial independence, security, and expediency in transactions. What many continue to ignore is that the current economic infrastructure is simply not working. How is it, that we have a global financial…

Keep Reading

The Confessions Of a Once Raging Liberal

in Economics/Politics by

In my first year at the university, a friend of mine referred to me as a raging liberal.  I was very involved in the peace movement and still believe that offensive war is a failure of governments to solve disagreements in a rational way.  While I disagree vigorously with the postmodern association of “liberalism” as being synonymous with relativism, I am a liberal in the classic sense in that I believe in the free exchange of ideas and the ability of reason to determine between the good and the evil, the beautiful and the ugly and the intelligent and the ignorant.  Unlike the relativist who has a hard time making judgments, this ability to discriminate is the true sign of an enlightened individual. As a confused and misguided college youth, I flirted with the dead end of liberalism and in hindsight, would certainly do some things differently.  Like Reagan who came out of the left, I found it much more dangerous to our Republic than anything on the right.…

Keep Reading

Beheading Children Beneath The Black Flag

in Politics by

Qur’an, Surah 8:12 – “I will cast terror into the hearts of those who disbelieve. Therefore strike off their heads and strike off every fingertip of them”  Matthew 24:9 – “Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake.” There is an unambiguous contrast drawn between those two statements of faith. In one, ostensibly fundamentalist words being used by groups like Islamic State (aka ISIS, ISIL) and others to justify and motivate their persecution and butchery of Christians in Iraq and elsewhere. In the other, prescient words of warning to those whose faith would make them targets and victims of fanatical, bloodthirsty hatred. Canon Andrew White, Vicar of the Anglican Church in Baghdad, experienced the horror firsthand when Islamic State descended upon on the Christian town of Qaraqosh. “I’m almost in tears because I’ve just had somebody in my room whose little child was cut in half. I baptized his child in my church in Baghdad. This little boy, they named him after me – he…

Keep Reading

Go to Top

Thanks for visiting our site! Stay in touch with us by subscribing to our newsletter. You will receive all of our latest updates, articles, endorsements, interviews, and videos direct to your inbox. 

Send this to friend