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The Many Reasons Why Conservative Missourians Will Reject “Open Borders” Austin Petersen

in Politics by

Since announcing his candidacy for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, former Libertarian Party presidential candidate Austin Petersen has piqued the interest of Missouri conservatives seeking a candidate to unseat left-wing incumbent Claire McCaskill. A candidate with national prominence like Petersen would initially appear to be an ideal nominee in one of the most closely watched races of 2018. However, the more Republicans will learn about Petersen the less they will like him. Here are five reasons (of many) why Austin Petersen is not fit to represent Missourians: Immigration: Petersen supports allowing countless illegal immigrants to come across the United States border and become citizens to vote in our elections. In a YouTube video titled “Austin Petersen on Immigration,” he proclaimed his support for open borders, a radical leftist position on immigration which would allow millions of unskilled illegals to flood across our border. Petersen also supports granting these illegals amnesty which would allow them to affect American elections. Abortion: Petersen claims to be pro-life. This assertion, however, is…

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Like Trump, Nixon Also Wanted Allies To Supply Their Own Protection

in Politics/World by

Once upon a time, a Republican president formulated a doctrine that had little to do with regime change, and demanded that countries previously protected by the US military look to their own defense. Quickly into his first term, then-President Richard Nixon in 1969 announced “the Nixon Doctrine” which asserted that the nation’s Cold War allies in Asia would have to provide for their own protection. This policy, which reversed the thrust of US foreign policy for the last 20 years, was linked to the president’s campaign promise for “peace with honor” regarding US forces in Vietnam. By 1968, even some Cold War hawks regarded the conflict as a costly quagmire in terms of American lives (by 1968, more than 250,000 American soldiers had died), and Nixon sought a way to keep the American commitment to resist communist aggression in Asia while at the same time getting American soldiers out of the conflict. Announced as Nixon’s “Vietnamization” plan in 1969, the doctrine involved a phased withdrawal of American soldiers from…

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Jeff Sessions’s Drug-War Fanaticism Shows a Growing Gap Between DC And The States

in Politics by

In recent years, numerous states have been passing new reforms of the long-abused civil asset forfeiture in which police agencies seize private property without any due process. At least 11 states, plus the District of Columbia, have passed new reforms. Some reforms, such as those in New Mexico and Nebraska, prohibit asset forfeiture altogether in the absence of a criminal conviction. Other states have opted for a more incremental approach, and have settled for new mandates in which law enforcement agencies must publicly report what has been seized — with the intent of identifying abuse for possible additional future reforms. The Heritage Foundation has noted the significance of these reforms:

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The Rise Of Trump From An “Elite” Perspective

in Culture/History/Politics by

As we are well into the first year of the Trump administration, and leftists are still walking around in a dim haze of incredulity, I’d like to reflect a little on why the man was elected. As some of you have probably inferred from the title, I am (on paper) a “coastal elitist.” I was born and raised in New Jersey, I am college educated (holding both two undergraduate degrees and a graduate degree), and being that I read, exercise, and listen to classical music, I suppose my tastes run to the fairly “highbrow.” In practice, some of my other tastes and especially my finances, place me far outside the world of the elite. Perhaps it is my “being outside the box,” which is a polite way of saying “not having many people willing to associate with me” (because I’m a philosopher king, of course), that enables me to objectively view the out-of-nowhere political rise of Donald Trump. I myself was never 100 percent enamored by Trump, but I…

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Male Taxpayers Are Literally Rape Survivors

in Culture/History/Politics by

As always, we should begin by defining our terms: What is rape, and why is it bad? There is nothing inherently traumatic about a foreign object being inserted in the vagina. Women insert tampons in there several times a month. Moreover, a large majority of rapes are not forceful, so the concept of rape is not related to physical pain or mere penetration. Rapes can even occur without the victim being aware of it. Yet, rape is punished as severely as aggravated assault, such as breaking someone’s legs. Why is that? We punish rape for psychological reasons. Women who experience rape experience a loss of perceived autonomy over their reproductive outcomes. Our instincts have changed little since our hunter/gatherer times, so we often experience vestigial feelings originating from our past as tribesmen and tribeswomen. A woman inseminated by a man she did not choose prevents her from passing on the best quality genes. That is unless the man is more attractive than her, of course.

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How To Make Conservatism More Attractive To Minorities

in Culture/Politics by

As a Latino in the conservative movement, I can honestly say that conservatives have not hit the right notes with minorities. This is mostly because leftists and Democrats have a way of conflating right-wing ideas with immoral acts such as murder and racism, thus scaring minorities into leaning liberal. Even though it should be easy for conservatives to refute such notions, it tends to come off as pretentious and even bigoted to everyone else. In order to actually get minorities to switch to conservatism, we must choose our words carefully on certain issues, and take advantage of their genuine concerns regarding life in America. When interacting with Latinos, conservatives usually come off as harmful due to hard-line positions on immigration and border security. To alleviate this burden, conservatives should change the diction they typically use to talk about these issues. For example, when we use the phrase “border security,” we sound as if Latinos and other groups of people coming over the border threaten our way of life. The…

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Graham Greene: Catholic Communist

in History/Politics/Religion by

One of the more transparently manipulative and hypocritical slogans used by Western Communist Parties in the mid 1930s to recruit allies for Stalin was specifically designed for Catholics: “You can still take Communion and love the Soviet Union.” Graham Greene, novelist, pundit, and above all, Catholic, embodied this slogan. Indeed, Greene’s attempts to link Catholicism with a Soviet Union that persecuted priests from the get-go predated this slogan. Since the 1920s, Greene had sought to merge his Catholic faith with his Communist one, which prompted George Orwell, a foe of both organized religion and communism, to label Green the first “Catholic fellow traveler.” But even today, an argument is made that Greene was hostile to Communism in whatever form it took until his death in 1991. This school of thought relies on criticisms Greene made toward the ideology throughout his life.

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Fake News Sure Didn’t Start With Trump

in Politics by

Contrary to the narrative of Donald Trump’s friends and foes alike, the phenomenon of “fake news” long precedes the 2016 presidential election, even if the moniker is of a fairly recent vintage. To deem an item reported by journalists a piece of “fake news” is not necessarily to say that it is patently false. Of course, fake news does not preclude outright lying on the part of “fake journalists”—those who are motivated not by a desire to inform the public as much as they are driven by political, financial, and/or professional considerations. What makes a fake journalist fake is their desire to advance their own agenda, or the agenda of the corporation or political party that signs their paychecks. Yet more often than not, fake news contains some truth. It is precisely this kernel of truth that it contains that makes it as effective as it is. In other words, fake news derives its identity more by what it veils than by what it unveils. Take, for example, the…

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Claud Cockburn: Pioneer Of The Mainstream Media

in History/Politics by

Conservatives today locate the origins of the “mainstream media” in the Watergate and Vietnam era; when every reporter since has wanted to have the presidency-toppling effect of a Woodward and Bernstein. But from Watergate on, the presidencies that reporters have wanted toppled have been exclusively Republican ones. Much of this partisanship had to do with the inclusion of New Leftist ideologues, ironically once anti-establishment toward the press, burrowing into the profession and the academia that trains future journalists. Conservatives are certainly correct that the profession today is dominated by leftists who never left the late sixties, where objectivity was an obstacle to their political goals and thus jettisoned; and these propaganda techniques continue today by the journalists who leftist academics indoctrinate as college students.

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Cucked By The ADL: Gavin McInnes Institutes Thought Control On His “Proud Boys”

in Culture/Politics by

It’s always like conservatives and libertarians to take a good thing and ruin it unnecessarily. After the Anti-Defamation League–the leftist thought control agency–profiled controversial Rebel Media and Compound Media host Gavin McInnes as a racist and potential terror threat for founding the Proud Boys, he responded with a near-immediate purge of alt-right members from his pro-West fraternal organization. “For the record, #ProudBoys [Virginia] are not alt-right. Stop splitting the group w that sh-t. If you are a [Virginia] PB who is [alt-right], you’re not a [Virginia] PB,” McInnes wrote in a Tweet with ominous ramifications for his group as a whole, which is supposed to have local autonomy. McInnes certainly did the cause of freedom a favor by creating the Proud Boys, but it seems his creation has gotten out of hand. It caught on very quickly, and became a national phenomenon faster than anyone could have reasonably imagined. Looking at their old promotional video, it may have began as a complete joke. As a frequent Compound Media watcher, that…

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Truman Would Have Agreed With Trump On The CIA In Syria

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Said the president: “For some time I have been disturbed by the way CIA has been diverted from its original assignment. It has become an operational and, at times, a policy-making arm of the Government. … [T]his quiet intelligence arm of the President has been so removed from its intended role that it is being interpreted as a symbol of sinister and mysterious foreign intrigue.” This dire warning about the propensity of the Central Intelligence Agency to go rogue did not come from Trump, but rather Harry S. Truman. Truman’s call to “limit the CIA role to intelligence” was published in December 22, 1963 by the Washington Post (WaPo). The same newspaper is now decrying President Trump’s decision to “end the CIA’s covert program to arm and train moderate Syrian rebels battling the government of Bashar al-Assad, a move long sought by Russia, according to U.S. officials.” The move is a good one. The WaPo threw Russia into the reportorial mix purely to sully President Trump, and due to…

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Why Democrats Are More Unified Than The GOP

in Politics by

Thanks to at least nine opposing Republican senators, Congress left for its July 4 break without passing a replacement bill for Obamacare. The opposition from these Republicans was two-fold: Four conservatives thought the GOP bill on the table went too far in retaining government control over the medical insurance market, while five centrist members complained it doesn’t go far enough in providing federal funding for Medicaid in their states, and would leave 22 million Americans overall without medical insurance. The free-marketers in the party have countered the centrist Republicans by indicating that many of the 22 million who will not be insured under the new system are young people who were forced to buy Obamacare insurance. Why should they continue to be forced to buy what they don’t want and probably don’t need? Moreover, payment for Medicaid expenses will be left to the states, which will be free to deal with this arrangement as they see fit. And within a few years both medical premiums and the taxes currently…

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The Conflicting Ideology Of Anthony Burgess

in Culture by

Anthony Burgess’ disturbing dystopia, A Clockwork Orange, has been lauded by liberals as exhibit A in how society is to blame for criminals. His thrill-seeking murderer Alex, upon being “cured” of his homicidal tendencies is abused by society when he re-surfaces into the real world. For him to “cope” with this criminal society, the process that cured him is reversed, and the reader is left with the impression that criminal tendencies are the only way to survive in society. But the writer behind this “we’re all to blame” novel was in fact a social conservative. Burgess desired a Catholic monarchy running the British government. According to him, these views affected his writing: ‘The novels I’ve written are really medieval Catholic in their thinking, and people don’t want that today.” Although claiming that Jesus used heaven as simply a “metaphor,” Burgess did note its possibilities as an actual place: “If it was suddenly revealed to me that the eschatology of my childhood was true, that there was a hell and…

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Mother’s Little Helper?

in Culture/History by

A major part of the progressive mindset is the notion of a linear path of history (one might call it a “progression”). This is essentially the belief that all things today are better than all things in the past, and all things in the future will be better than all things today. Since things today are supposed to be good, this belief engenders a demonization of the past when problems inevitably arise in the present, as they tend to do in all ages. It’s not very difficult to find examples of this phenomenon in the cultures of various far-left regimes that profess to be leading the way into a glorious future (in contrast, far right regimes tend to be more about reviving an idealized past, but that’s a different issue)–The Chinese Cultural Revolution and the various intellectual purges of the Soviet Union are good examples of the nation’s history and culture being destroyed, in many cases literally.

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The Napoleonic Touch

in History/Politics by

Some observers have smugly claimed that it is impossible to have a reactionary movement. They say it would be like piecing a ruined cobweb back together or trying to set Humpty Dumpty back on his wall. For them, it is one item on a long list of impossibilities. If one supposes that reactionaries want to return to some glittering past in every particular and detail, then the critics are right; it cannot be done. Fortunately, we are not focused on bringing back the poke bonnet or illuminated manuscripts; that is to say, nobody is trying to revive the little irrelevancies of bygone eras. The reactionary goal is to return to the spirit of an age, not its particulars. We only need to extract what worked from the past and juxtapose it onto the present. It is a process of adapting the present to the past, rather than trying to impose the past onto the future. Perhaps the most compelling point against critics is that history provides examples of reactionary…

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The Duchess Of Atholl: Nobility For Stalin

in History by

In the film version of George Orwell’s book Keep The Aspidistra Flying, the main character, a struggling writer, assumes correctly that because a benefactor of writers is wealthy, said benefactor is therefore a communist. This assumption was very much a reality in the upper class intellectual world of 1930s Britain. For it was not only the expensively educated like Stephen Spender and W.H. Auden–and on a more sinister level, Kim Philby–who were pro-Stalin, but also Nancy Cunard, the daughter of a shipping magnate. This zeitgeist was so pervasive, that this pampered faction had a titled conservative in their ranks; who, ironically, defended Stalinism out of British imperialist motives. This figure was the Duchess of Atholl aka Katherine Marjory Stewart-Murray, who despite representing the Conservative Party member in Parliament clashed with her fellow conservatives because of their support for appeasing Hitler. Very much a “premature anti-fascist,” she expressed her disgust at the government’s deal-cutting with and outright support of fascist dictators by frequently resigning; first as Conservative Whip in 1937…

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The Donald Trump Jr. “Scandal” Highlights The Imminent Decline Of The Mainstream Media

in Politics by

I haven’t wanted to write about the whole Donald Trump Jr. thing because the story is utter crap, but here I find myself writing about a crap story with nothing underpinning it but crap piled upon layer after layer of crap. The Democratic partisans, enraged liberals, and their lapdogs in the mainstream media have been salivating over this particular fake news story, which says more about them than it does about Trump Jr. and his father’s administration. Here’s something worth noting that won’t get brought up by MSNBC or CNN or the New York Times: Famed liberal stalwart Alan Dershowitz even says that the Trump Jr. story is crap. You may now be asking yourself, “Okay, it might be crap, but how is it fake news? Even Trump Jr. admitted to his own culpability by releasing his e-mails, doesn’t that mean it’s a true story?” Sure, I don’t dispute that a meeting occurred between Trump Jr. and some sleazy Russian lawyer and her sleazy Russian compatriots. It’s not fake…

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Even Partial Drug Legalization Goes a Long Way In Protecting Property Rights

in Economics/Politics by

The partial legalization of marijuana has not been particularly ideal. Thanks to high regulatory burdens on the marijuana-production industry, limitations on production volume, and high taxes, black markets have persisted within those states that have adopted a variety of legalization measures. Perhaps most burdensome has been ongoing federal banking regulations that essentially prohibit marijuana producers from using commercial banking services. The resulting reliance on physical cash has led in many cases to more robbery and inefficiencies within the cannabis industry. Nevertheless, even partial legalization has brought at least some of the benefits that one would expect. Cannabis products are now subject to commercial quality control. That is, a customer who walks into a dispensary or storefront now has a much better idea of what he’s buying. When cannabis sales took place only in the black market, one could only guess at the provenance of the product, and customers had no legal recourse in cases of fraud. One of the greatest benefits, from a laissez-faire perspective, has been the fact…

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The Tragedy Of The Commons In The Prison System

in Economics/Politics by

In a previous article, I wrote about how the war on drugs and the government monopoly on the legal system has created the Tragedy of the Commons in our justice system. Because legislators and police officers have every incentive to appear “tough on crime” but the cost of the sending a criminal to a courtroom is socialized, the courts have become increasingly backlogged. What that article did not cover is the related “commons problem” in the prison system and the consequences that follow. Where legislators and police officers have in-built incentives to send as many people through the courts as possible, a similar incentive is faced by judges and prosecutors to send defendants through the prison system. Because all judges and prosecutors share common access to prison space with no individual cost for doing so, there is zero incentive for the limitation on the sentence sought by the individual prosecutor or handed down by the individual judge.

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Net Neutrality Strengthens Monopolies, Invites Corruption

in Politics by

When it imposed its net neutrality rules on the telecom industry, the FCC was fixing a problem that didn’t exist. While proponents of Net Neutrality have long claimed that the regulations are necessary to impose fairness for Internet usage, access to the Internet has only become more widespread and service today is far faster for users—including “ordinary” people—than it was twenty years ago. Nevertheless, when the FCC in recent months—now under pressure from the Trump Administration—announced that it may step back from net neutrality, supporters immediately began claiming that net neutrality was necessary to keep Internet access affordable and “fair.” In truth, net neutrality has never fostered fairness or better access for consumers, and has instead created conditions that will encourage less competition and more monopolistic power for large firms within the industry. Instead of relying on the marketplace to allocate goods, net neutrality ensures that politics will determine who gets what, instead. This is hardly a recipe for fairness or neutrality. In the marketplace, goods and services tend…

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GOP Health Care Reform Means The Likely Demise Of Obamacare’s “Death Panel”

in Politics by

Over the past several months, the mainstream media and Washington elite have perpetuated conspiracy theories and demonstrably false narratives in an effort to distract and stymie the current administration from reforming America’s health care–and the claims are growing ever more outlandish. In one article, CNN teeth-clinchingly claimed that under the bill formerly known as the American Health Care Act (AHCA), rape and domestic violence could qualify as pre-existing conditions. In another, Salon asserted that women who undergo C-sections could be “monetarily punished” under the bill. Despite this propaganda campaign, President Trump and a Republican-controlled Congress are working hard behind the scenes to erode the last vestiges of the disastrous Affordable Care Act (ACA), colloquially referred to as Obamacare–including the problematic Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB). Opposition from both parties has formed against IPAB, a bureaucratic board with the authority to change Medicare policy since its creation through the Affordable Care Act. The board, consisting of fifteen presidentially-appointed members, exists solely to recommend yearly cuts to Medicare costs.

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What A Conservative Health Care Bill Ought To Look Like

in Economics/Politics by

Now that House and Senate Republicans have released health care bills, I have come to one conclusion: the GOP is in need of major help writing a health care bill. They never seem to get it right, and they always fall short of making these bills conservative. Consequently, I have created a guideline that highlights the problems within the Senate and House bills, and how they can be fixed. Problem #1: Both House and Senate bills continue spending and subsidizing for poor people and states. Although it sounds moral to give the poor tax credits for health care, it will only hurt them in the long run. The moment insurers realize that the poor now have money to spend, they will raise prices to meet the overflow of demand. Eventually, health insurance will only become more expensive and the problem will be akin to rising college tuition rates. The worst part is that politicians have no sense of economics. To alleviate this problem, they will likely raise tax credits in…

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Young Americans For Liberty Scandal Goes Viral, Students For Liberty Host To Cover ‘YAL-Gate’ Tonight

in Politics by

It is now official: all of the work that the Young Americans for Liberty activists did in Michigan on their “Liberty Summer” for the “Clean Michigan Government” campaign was for naught. The “Clean Mi Govt” campaign for a part-time legislature, spearheaded by career politician Brian Calley to rehab his image for his upcoming run for Governor, has been a catastrophe on every imaginable level. Calley’s public image, already in the dumps because of his tenure as Lieutenant Governor next to infamous water-poisoning Governor Rick Snyder, has sunk even lower after his part-time legislature campaign came unglued under his watch. Last week, the Detroit News revealed the campaign’s extensive connections to entrenched lobbyists and dark money PACs. Worse yet, the miserable campaign gave a unique glimpse the corrupt underbelly of the national student liberty movement.

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Letter From England 1: Setting The Scene

in History/Politics/World by

I have been asked to write a weekly column on British politics. Since I am writing for a largely American readership, and since Americans mostly know little of what happens outside their own country, I think it would be best if I were to begin with a brief overview not only of what is happening here, but also of what has been happening for quite some time. David Cameron became Prime Minister in 2010 at the head of a Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition. The Conservatives had won more seats than any other party in the House of Commons, but fallen short of an overall majority. Whether he governed the country well during the next five years is beside the point. What matters is that he governed effectively within the assumptions of British politics. He went into the 2015 General Election with the aim of getting an overall majority for the Conservative Party. His main difficulty was not in beating the Labour Party, which was in no position to beat him,…

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Cultural Incompetence Is An Excuse For Lawlessness

in Culture by
cultural incompetence

Less than an hour from where I sit, in Manchester, New Hampshire, a travesty of justice unfolded when Andrea Muller, a city prosecutor, dropped six domestic violence charges against defendant Augustin Bahati. Bahati’s guilt should have been a no brainer and his conviction should have been a slam dunk and if he weren’t a black immigrant, it very well could have been. But he wasn’t white and he wasn’t a native born Granite Stater, and as such he was allowed to go free after having severely beaten a woman who was twenty-seven weeks pregnant. The reason given by the city of Manchester (infamously dubbed Manchvegas by those of us in the 603) for the dismissal of charges was simple and mind blowing: Cultural incompetence. Said another way, Augustin Bahati simply didn’t know any better. District Court Judge William Lyons went even further by saying that not only is Bahati blameless due to his cultural incompetence – beating women must be a sign of competence in the Democratic Republic of…

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A Confederacy Of Dunces By JK Toole

in Culture by

A Confederacy of Dunces. Undoubtedly, this is a novel that most of the people reading this article have heard of, whether by hearing it described vaguely as a contender for the Great American Novel, hearing it spoken of in hushed tones due to the alleged “curse” on the property that has caused every attempt at capturing it on film to go belly up (mostly from its prospective lead actor dying unexpectedly), or being described simply as one of the funniest novels ever written. While the first two points are rather debatable, the last one is not. This novel is extremely funny, and yet at the same time slightly terrifying to those of us in the reactosphere. Decades before the manosphere, or neo-masculinity, or neo-reaction, or the alt-right were even a twinkle in anyone’s eyes, John Kennedy Toole mercilessly skewered the self-appointed right-wing restorers of wholesomeness and “the proper order.” Anyone who might even consider themselves to be fighting for a return to morality and truth ought to read this…

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The Struggle To Publish Animal Farm

in Culture/History by

George Orwell’s devastating satire on Stalinism, Animal Farm remains even 72 years later, along with Nineteen Eighty-Four, the gold standard for totalitarian literature. But Orwell’s classic novel which established the phrase “Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others” nearly didn’t secure a publisher, who based their rejections not on the quality of the book, but because of its unwelcome politics. Written and submitted during the height of Soviet popularity in 1943-1945, who, as a war-time ally pushed Hitler all the way back to Berlin, the fable was rejected not only by pro-Stalinists and at least one KGB agent, but by conservatives as well. Copies were even burned at one point in protest.

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Make Cities Great Again: How And Why Conservatives Should Embrace The Metropolis, Not Abandon It

in Politics by

In the wake of Donald Trump’s win, you might have noticed a new swamp spring up–one that Trump certainly wouldn’t want to drain. You were likely swamped with the same meme ad nauseum, comparing maps of “Trump’s America” and “Hillary’s America.” The meme-making quality: Trump’s America is far larger than Hillary’s precisely because it consists of those counties in which he won the majority of the vote, namely, rural areas. In contrast, Hillary Clinton won mostly the coastal US, especially the country’s largest cities, by wide margins. We can laugh at the radical different geographic spreads of each tally, but they underscore a deeper demographic problem. Trump lost the popular vote by nearly 2 million votes, even though his geographic spread was far greater than Clinton’s. This is only possible because Clinton won the most populous areas of the US–the biggest cities. Trump was wildly unpopular in most of California (whose population centers are located in San Francisco and Los Angeles) and even his home state, New York (New…

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Another Swamp Creature Picked To Lead The FBI Under President Trump

in Politics by

Christopher Wray, President Donald Trump’s FBI director nominee, seems to be a perfectly nice man, but nothing he said during his July 12 confirmation hearings distinguishes him as someone who would reform former President Barack Hussein Obama’s Islamophilic FBI. President Trump ran on a set of ideas based around aggressively stopping Islamic terror. Like a fly-in-amber, the Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) governing the Obama FBI guarantee to preserve the same systemic, intractable failures that unleashed mass murderers such as Omar Mateen or Syed Farook to maim and murder dozens of Americans. From Wray’s comments to the Senate Judiciary Committee, he made it clear how he’ll bravely break with President Trump, but indicated that he’s partial to his predecessor, James Comey. To wit, Wray said he sided with Comey in rejecting a domestic surveillance program in 2004, “… not because he knew the substance of the dispute,” but because of his affection for Comey. Given his unalloyed loyalty, Wray will be unlikely to remove from FBI training manuals the fiction…

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“The Necessary Murder”

in History/Politics by

Omitted from leftist narratives as to why those of their own defected to the anti-Communist side is how a single murder provoked the defection. Instead pro-Communists and “anti-anti-Communists” assign base motives to these supposedly mentally unstable drunks such as a desire for the latter to line their pockets and for a new appreciation of fascism. Ernest Hemingway, who sought a relationship with the Soviet secret police, used the greed argument against his one-time friend John Dos Passos for publicly accusing Communists during the Spanish Civil War of murdering Dos Passos’ friend, Jose Robles. Hemingway with help from the Soviet-directed loyalist government justified the murder because Robles was “a fascist spy” for Franco. Disgusted, Dos Passos became a fervent anti-Communist who later voted for Barry Goldwater.

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God, Morality, And Nature

in Philosophy/Religion by

Recently on an episode of The Rubin Report, Dave Rubin organized a thoughtful discussion between Dennis Prager and Micheal Shermer on the subject of God and morality. The two men discussed for over an hour whether or not morality is a product of God or inherent in human beings. They also touched upon other subjects such as the existence of God, secularism, and other religions. Needless to say, it was an interesting discussion that, despite its greatness, frustrated me because of the lack of understanding people still have about God. Atheists always seem to think that they know everything about the universe when they do not, and Believers seem to think that all evidence of God can only be found in religious doctrines when it can be found elsewhere. I want to offer a different approach to proving the existence of God that fuses reasoning from the Enlightenment, science, and religion itself. Let’s begin with morality. It sounds pedantic, but morality must be defined and we must discover why…

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What Is Our End Game?

in Philosophy/Politics by

We’ve made the big time, folks! And by “we,” I don’t mean “me,” specifically, but rather the reactosphere as a nebulous organization has made the big time! The New York Times, the Washington Post, and other esteemed publications are talking about the alt-right, the manosphere, neoreaction, paleoconservatism, and all of the various permutations of intellectual louts that give the powers-that-be a nervous twinge. And yet, of all the articles by “proper thinkers” on us, I was most affected by a Cracked article. You remember Cracked, don’t you? That website that used to feature light humor and occasionally thought-provoking articles before Jason “David Wong” Pargin (I won’t address the cultural appropriation) went down the social justice rabbit hole and turned his website into a low(er) rent version of Salon, much to the dismay of his former fans? A few months ago, they published an article titled “Some Brief Friendly Advice About Racism,” in which Mr. “Wong” attempted to analyze the reactosphere in an objective way to prove us wrong. While…

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Abolish The ATF

in Politics by

Although Donald Trump portrayed himself as an anti-gun control candidate on the campaign trail, the president apparently has no problem with sending federal agents into Chicago to more fiercely enforce gun laws. The New York Times reported late last month that the Trump administration has sent in federal agencies to partner with local law enforcement in Chicago, in order to confiscate more guns: Anthony Riccio, the chief of the Police Department’s Bureau of Organized Crime, said the new team would “significantly help our efforts to trace and stop the flow of illegal guns.” The phrase “illegal guns” makes it sound like we’re only dealing with very sinister elements within society. But in Chicago, where gun control laws are among the most stringent in the country, the phrase “illegal guns” might as well be interpreted as “most guns, whether owned by peaceful people or not.” Thus, it appears that the Trump administration is using federal agents to assist local politics in what is one of the most anti-gun jurisdictions in…

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