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Politics

Political opinion & commentary on current events, elections, legislation, and policy.

In Search Of Monsters

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The Democrats in Washington D.C. have been loud about impeaching President Donald Trump for a six month period. It seems to be their one trick pony. In fact, those on the Left are even calling out the blatant obviousness. In an article published on CNBC, a columnist stated that: “Getting back to the Democrats, their entire agenda can now be summed up as: Impeachment, resignation or bust. They’ve put all their eggs in this basket. And if they fail, a lot of their voters will clearly ask what good the current leadership is if it can’t even oust a man so much of the Democratic base sees as nothing short of the devil.” It’s fair to study the constitutionality behind an impeachment and their claims for it. First, they invoke Article II Section 4 of the Constitution, which states:

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Antifas Defeated: Patriots In Boston Reach Victory Without a Battle

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From the country’s seventh oldest settlement in New Hampshire – Dover – route sixteen will take you to ninety-five, from there you hop on one, and from there you hop on ninety-three, all south, and eventually you can find your way to the Government Square Exit. From there on out, you’re in no man’s land and you’re on your own in Big Dig and Duck Boat territory. It’s a place of wacky accents (pahk the cah neah the bah) and strange lingo (wicked pissah kehd) where movies are shot for audiences who ask, “Do they really swear that much?” and no, we don’t swear that much, we swear more. Out here in the wild, wild east, we use the “f” word the way other parts of the country say “uh” and “um” and we drink beer like it’s dirty water and if you don’t keep up we’ll let you know you don’t fit in. And if you have a problem with that you probably won’t come back but you’ll…

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Sanctuary City Mayor Trashes An American Hero

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Mayor Mike Signer—who had declared his intention to make Charlottesville, Virginia, the “capital of the resistance” to President Trump and a sanctuary city “to protect immigrants and refugees”—is refusing to protect a symbol saluting one of America’s greatest men. Yes, Robert E. Lee was a great American. If Signer knew the first thing about human valor, he’d know that there was no man more valorous and courageous than Robert E. Lee, whose “two uncles signed the Declaration of Independence and [whose] father was a notable cavalry officer in the War for Independence.”

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Libertarian Lawmakers Criticize Trump Administration’s Support Of Mandatory Minimum Policies

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Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) and Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) are up in arms after Attorney General Jeff Sessions released sentencing guidelines last week indicating his favor of mandatory minimum sentences that were being phased out by the Obama administration. The two libertarian lawmakers have been long-time advocates for criminal justice reform. They feel that the Trump Administration under Sessions is clearly headed in the wrong direction on this particular policy, which will only serve to clog the prisons further while doing little to prevent crime. “Mandatory minimum sentences have unfairly and disproportionately incarcerated too many minorities for too long,” Paul said in a press release. “Attorney General Sessions’ new policy will accentuate that injustice. Instead, we should treat our nation’s drug epidemic as a health crisis and less as a ‘lock ‘em up and throw away the key’ problem.” Amash concurred with Paul’s statement. He said the following in a Twitter post from May 12, “Let’s pass criminal justice reform to put an end to this unjust, ineffective, and…

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Are Parents No Longer Teaching Respect?

in Culture/Politics by

Berkley continues allowing liberal snowflakes to rule their institution. And why wouldn’t they? Universities are businesses. They need to keep customers happy. Otherwise, they take their business elsewhere. School administrators don’t approve of the property damage caused by student’s outbursts. Yet, those students have parents paying huge loads of money, funding their education. Which, in turn, finances the institution. These temper tantrums, in the name of social justice (of course), could represent a more serious problem which has been happening for decades. Our parents and our grandparents were held responsible for their bad behavior growing up. Back then, parents sided with school administrators, reminding their children that teachers were not their babysitters. However, a complete cultural 180 has taken place, and not just with liberal dominated schools like Berkley, but across the nation. When kids act up, it seems parents question why school administrators are so hard on their kids.  Then, in situations where a teacher or principal attempts to handle an out-of-control student, parents make claims that their…

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America’s Inconsistent Relationship With James Comey

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One of the most controversial figures in American politics over the last year didn’t run for President. Now former Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey has repeatedly drawn the ire of either side of the political spectrum. Undoubtedly, given the stakes in a presidential election, his position was a no-win scenario. He was faced with allegations of mishandling classified information involving one candidate and improper foreign connections involving another candidate. At what point does the F.B.I. intervene with its progress and when does it decide to stand back from potentially influencing the election? For Comey, these questions likely weighed heavily. Yet, for many observers across America, it was more about Comey’s relationship to their respective candidate or political party. Over the course of several months, he went from being loved to hated and back again. One moment, Comey was a shill for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and another moment he was protecting President Donald Trump.

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The Utility Of Pessimism

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We are often told, in this happiness-obsessed age of ours, to be happy. “Be happy,” they say, “Be optimistic.” The Panglossian phrase, “the best of all possible worlds” is on the tongue of every life-coach, every politician, every celebrity, every advertiser. It is almost a crime to be a nay-sayer to the idol of Happiness, though the happiness of which they speak is not the eudaimonia, the human flourishing described by Aristotle in his Ethics. No, it is the in-the-moment animal enjoyment of mindless consumption and the attendant, toothy smile plastered on the mindless consumer’s face. Pessimism has had a bad name for the past sixty years of so, but it is now coming back into vogue, especially among the far-right in Europe and America. Suddenly we detect shades of the past, shades from the entre deux guerre era and the fin de siècle. And it is not just on the tongues of those inclined to authoritarianism – liberals in the time of Trump decry “fascism” at every turn…

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The Battle For Ideas Is Never Won

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The battle for ideas is never won. Just because you win an election, it does not mean you get to rest on your laurels. Over the last couple of weeks, I have heard many conservatives complain that they think Congress has let them down. In the minds of conservatives, Republicans control the House, the Senate, and the White House. This makes it time for Republicans to actually fulfill their campaign promises and repeal the un-affordable Health Care Act (ObamaCare), build the wall, and reduce the size of government. Conservatives are making the same mistake that the United States military made in Operation Anaconda. Operation Anaconda took place shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the mountains of Afghanistan. In Not a Good Day to Die, author Sean Naylor explains that things had been going so well in Afghanistan that U.S. military leaders created a strategy based upon the Taliban insurgents laying down their weapons and running for their lives. The Taliban eventually lost the battle, but not before…

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Authority As National Sanity

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Somalia is not known for its natural beauty. Its landscape is rocky and dotted here and there with dusty shrubs and acacias poking through the sand. Less than two percent of the land is arable. It must be said that the ocean there is very beautiful and very blue, but turning away from the ocean to face the shore again brings back into view the rocky hillsides and the crumbling hovels that the Somalians call home. The political landscape of Somalia fares no better. It is a patchwork of warlords who have each parceled out a slice of mud to call his own, to rule according to his whims and fetishes. There are the Islamic warlords of al-Shabaab in the south, the government strongmen who collaborate with al-Shabaab when it suits them, the Somaliland separatists who want a separate nation in the north, and a thousand other men of questionable loyalties. To most people, Somalia is just another African sand-pie, a footnote at the end of a long and dismal…

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A Lesson From The Tripolitan War

in History/Politics by
Tripolitan War

In the west, people tend to have short memories. Typically this isn’t a problem because most lapses in memory tend to be centered around the mundane: Where you left your car keys, picking up the dry-cleaning, the date of your third cousin’s wedding to the Shriner who resembles Dwight Yoakam, only uglier – if you can imagine that. With any luck you’ll find your keys, get to the dry-cleaner, and, hopefully, you chose something more becoming to wear to the nuptial ceremony than a leisure suit. These things are easily understood and forgiven, if not completely relatable. The leisure suit… Not so much. It’s the bigger things we forget that are less understandable. Entire wars are said to have been lost to the sands of time. Less notable than the Korean War is the Tripolitan War which was declared against the United States some two hundred and sixteen years ago. Angered by President Thomas Jefferson’s refusal to pay ransom in exchange for captured merchant vessels, Yusuf Pasha declared war…

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The Hypocrisy Of Hillary Clinton Supporters Against Marine Le Pen

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In 2016, politics was at a critical crossroads for the United States. After eight years of Barack Obama, both sides of the political spectrum viewed it as a major moment in history. Former President Obama had advanced the liberal agenda and electing a Democrat would help stabilize his progress. Conservatives viewed this election as a critical moment to reverse the perceived damage of the Obama legacy. In short, the hyperbole and rhetoric were running high. Clinton supporters took on the cause of electing the first female President. The case for American progress was clear. The American electorate could make history by electing their first female President in history. For her supporters, the reasons for supporting the career politician were simple. She has a long career in politics, ranging from being a First Lady to former President Bill Clinton to being a United States Senator. She has been active on the scene for decades in a number of roles, being active in her political party and government itself.

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Democrats Were Warned About Excessive Executive Power

in Philosophy/Politics by

Democrats and prominent liberals have engaged in alarmist fear-mongering for months in response to the agenda of President Donald Trump. Whether it is his targeting of illegal immigrants here in America or his using the presidency to interfere with other processes, Democrats have sounded the alarm about what they claim is unprecedented tyranny in the Oval Office. The problem is we have seen all of this before, and we have seen even worse. Is President Trump hurting people’s feelings worse than Democratic President Franklin Delano Roosevelt deciding that race and heritage alone was reason enough to force Japanese Americans into concentration camps during World War II? Is President Trump deporting criminals currently in America illegally any different than his Democratic predecessor using executive power for immigration policy?

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What Sounds More Radical: “Tea Party” Or “The Resistance”?

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Given the rhetoric of conservative activists and Republican officials during the 2008 presidential campaign, it was clear that the opposition to President Barack Obama would be strong. At the time, the rhetoric often spoke of unprecedented socialism and the idea that America would be forever changed. Obama was seen as more than just a liberal or a progressive, he was a devout socialist with numerous ties to dangerous radicals to his opponents. After Obama took office, a movement of conservatives and libertarians would rise from the ashes of a defeated cause. Despite failing to stop Obama in 2008, these activists and concerned Americans would not give up. The result was a movement of people known as the “Tea Party.” The name is derived from the original Boston Tea Party during the American Revolutionary period, where demonstrators dressed up as Native Americans and dumped tea into Boston Harbor.

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Thoughts On The Reagan Years And Trump

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With all the talk of Trump abandoning his campaign promises (and I’m certainly upset about that myself), and the diminishing fervor for the “god emperor,” there’s another right-wing “sacred cow” that I would like to take down a few pegs, and that’s one that Mr. Trump himself mentioned idealistically in one of his speeches. Namely… Can we all just admit Ronald Reagan was a pretty crappy president? I don’t know, maybe it’s just because I’m, by my own admission, something of a “disgruntled liberal” whose views gradually turned rightward after being disillusioned with liberalism, but having noticed that mainstream American conservatism is turning more towards a paleoconservative slant (or rather, it was supposed to with the election of Trump), I still don’t get why Reagan is treated with kid gloves, and I want to address why nobody sees this. What is it about President Reagan that made him such a conservative icon—indeed, what made him so conservative at all?

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Is It Knowledge Or Government Approval That Defines An Engineer?

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Certification requirements are sometimes logical constructs. When it comes to the medical field, one would like to know that a surgeon who is operating on their bodies knows what they’re doing. Of course, certification does not necessarily mean one will not make mistakes or make bad decisions. Then there are more absurd licensing requirements for professions that shouldn’t even require government certification. For example, in Washington state to become a certified manicurist, one must perform 600 training hours and pay $150 to take a test, costs that could amount to several thousand dollars. Why is this necessary if someone knows how to perform the job and shows an obvious understanding for the job? This is the case a self-described engineer made by Mats Järlström in Portland, Oregon. He was fined by the Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying for practicing engineering without a license. The offense was pitching a new mathematical formula for intersection traffic cameras.

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Between a Pregnant Woman And Unborn Female, Who Claims “women’s Rights”?

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Abortion has become a heated topic in society, often polarizing ordinary people and being a heavy source of contention between the two main political parties. Should a pregnant woman have a right to abort her child? If so, what does that mean for the unborn child within her? Alternatively, is the fetus within a pregnant woman truly a human being and at what point does it gain rights? Science often takes a backseat in the issue with politics taking the forefront. Liberals claim this is an issue of women’s rights. The argument is that a woman’s body is her own, thus making the decision hers. It’s not wrong to state that we should have final control over our own bodies. What is freedom if we have the government or other human beings controlling our body?

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Trump’s First 100 Days: The Good, The Bad, And Culture

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President Trump’s first 100 days have certainly had their share of pitfalls and disappointments (at least for many of his supporters). This being said, they have not been nearly as bad as either the Democrats’ media propagandists or even some of his supporters would have us think: (1) Corporations that would have otherwise relocated operations in other countries—Bayer and Monsanto; Walmart; Amazon; General Motors; Hyundai; Sprint/Softbank; and Carrier, to name but a handful—have been motivated by Trump’s election to remain in the United States. They have also pledged to create thousands of new jobs. (2) Consumer-confidence has “soared” under Trump to a high that it hadn’t reached in 17 years. Even the penultimate of “fake news,” CNN, perhaps the one network that despises the President more than any other, had to acknowledge this. In typical CNN fashion, however, it wasted no time in immediately qualifying this fact by noting that consumers’ “track record when it comes to predicting the financial future” is checkered.

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House Passing Obamacare Lite Reminds Us Why Federal Politics Is A Lost Cause

in Philosophy/Politics by

Among libertarians, limited government conservatives and nullification activists known as “Tenthers”, there is a commonly held belief that all politics are local. Central to this belief is the fact that liberty cannot be achieved at a national level. History has reminded us of this fact time and time again. When the federal government maintained slavery and mandated the return of runaway slaves, everyone from individuals to government officials at the state and local levels stood up to nullify the slavery machine. More recent examples include the tug-o-war over healthcare policy in America. Several years ago, former President Barack Obama signed his hallmark legislation, the Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act. Better known as “Obamacare”, this new entitlement would become a target of conservative ire over the years ahead and a common campaign target of Republicans. Thus, with the sweeping victory of Republicans last year, conservatives found hope that the legislation would finally be killed. Unfortunately, Republicans caved on their promise and decided to go soft on their ideas. Instead of…

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France Votes For Cultural Suicide

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The suspense is over. Marine Le Pen, the so-called “far-right” nationalist seeking to win the French presidency, has been defeated by EU suck-up sycophant Emmanuel Macron. The French voters were given a stark choice between the centrist Macron and the populist Le Pen: Continue following the path of cultural suicide – all the while expecting a long promised emergence of enrichment – or follow the path of drastic measures commensurate with the task of managing drastic times. The French chose cultural suicide, proving that things obviously haven’t gotten bad enough in their country to trigger their national survival instinct. Maybe they don’t have one or they did and lost their way under the leadership of unctuous elitists in Brussels. One way or the other, it seems the French threshold for self-inflicted suffering is as strong as many in the west had feared. Or perhaps they were successfully swayed by former Celebrity-in-Chief Barack Obama who interjected himself into their politics at the last minute.

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Thanks, POTUS, For Breaking-Up The Annual Correspondents’ Circle Jerk

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As a newly elected president, Donald Trump was quick to take one of Washington’s institutional pillars down a peg. By snubbing the 2017 annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner (WHCD), the president deflated what should have been more appropriately called the Sycophants’ Supper. Would that it was the last such supper. For now, the POTUS’s slap to this gathering of sycophants this past weekend will have to do. Like nothing else, the annual Correspondents’ Dinner is a mark of a corrupt politics. It’s a sickening specter, where some of the most pretentious, worthless people in the country—in politics, journalism and entertainment—convene to revel in their ability to petition and curry favor with one another, usually to the detriment of the rest of us in Rome’s provinces.

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Don’t Let Them Silence You

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A leftist narrative gaining a lot of momentum in our current climate is “hate speech isn’t free speech!”, which, in essence, translates to “this speech, that you use, is not protected by the first amendment”. Seems a bit…convenient. Challenge this narrative, requesting a definition of “hate speech” and you will most likely find out that “hate speech” just means anything with which they disagree. This is why they don’t view your speech as permissible or even defensible under the law (the very law which they do not understand). Liberals also own this narrative so they no longer see it valuable to defend free speech at all. The left wing in American politics is increasingly becoming more radical now that they seem to have a monopoly on allowable opinions. From here on out, the tyranny of the mob dictates. The terrifying reality of this is the censorship effect. There are truly great and decent people who just don’t want to be branded racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, etc. They don’t want to…

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The Civil War, Then And Now

in History/Politics by
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One hundred and fifty-four years ago this week, nearly at the peak of the Civil War, General Robert E. Lee cemented his legacy in American history with his triumph over Union forces at the battle of Chancellorsville, a victory often referred to as a perfect battle. It is an example of how sangfroid and strategy and chutzpah and cunning have together the potential to overcome overwhelming odds. It was a disgraceful performance by the north’s General Joseph Hooker and it cost Lee his “right arm” in General Stonewall Jackson, who was killed by friendly fire on the second of May. It’s an episode in our history we should be reminded of often. They say history is written by the winners. General Lee may or may not be a hero and, in spite of his martial brilliance in Spotsylvania, Virginia, he was and will always be a loser. The Confederacy didn’t get to write the history books. Two months after his perfect battle, without his best general, and emboldened beyond…

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Conservatives Should Rethink The Death Penalty

in Law/Politics by

Liberals typically do a horrible job of trying to turn conservatives against the death penalty. Here are some examples of largely refuted arguments that need to be put to rest: Argument a): ″If you are pro-life, shouldn′t you be against the death penalty?″ The distinction is pro-innocent-life. Argument b): ″If killing is wrong, why is it okay when the state does it?″ Murder is wrong, but not all killing is murder. Go look up the definition of murder if you have trouble with this. Sometimes, the government has to kill bad people. Did we win World War II by being assertive and understanding with Nazis? Argument c): ″France and Germany don′t have the death penalty, and they have a lower murder rate than the US.” Singapore and Japan have the death penalty, and they also have a lower murder rate than the US. America has a higher violent crime rate than other industrialized countries for a whole lot of reasons that have nothing to do with gun control or…

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Oliver Stone Educates And Misleads

in History/Politics by
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I recently had the opportunity to watch The Untold History of the United States by Oliver Stone and, as I’m sure was intended, it was a thought-provoking experience. It is for many reasons a masterpiece of documentary filmmaking. The research behind it left no stone unturned and the archival footage included in the ten-part series is awe-inspiring. It is well written and well narrated by Stone. It is thorough and informative and enlightens the viewer to the many unseemly aspects of governance in the greatest nation in the history of mankind. Less thorough and more friendly than Stone’s treatment of the USA is his examination of the Soviet Union which he depicts as a victim, one who heroically struck back with righteous fury against the evil forces of Hitler’s Germany and later against the oppression of western capitalism. Hitler and his Third Reich were indeed evil and crossed every line of decency developed over the centuries to protect the rights of man. The Nazis needed to be destroyed and…

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Genuine Political Revolutions Won’t Succeed Within Political Parties

in Philosophy/Politics by

American politics is essentially captive to the two major political parties and have been for centuries now. The Democratic Party is largely seen as representative of liberals just as Republicans are seen as synonymous with conservatism. Libertarianism tends to be grouped with Republicans despite having the Libertarian Party and progressivism with Democrats despite having the Socialist Party. But despite the ideological identification of each political party, each one lacks the consistency to be a genuine representation of their respective ideology. Democrats saw the rise of Senator Bernie Sanders last year, a progressive politician and admirer of socialism. Despite him arguably being a better representation of liberalism, the party nominated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for President. This occurred despite Clinton being a polar opposite of what many liberals favor. She was close to Wall Street, supported the invasion of Iraq, and is otherwise a career politician aligned with a deeply entrenched establishment.

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The Battle Of Berkeley 4: Peace And Another Victory For The Deplorables

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In February, the terrorist wing of the Democrat Party, the so-called “Antifa” (“antifascist”), rioted at University of California at Berkeley in order to prevent Milo Yiannopoulos from delivering a speech. The anti-American leftist thugs randomly assaulted innocents, threw Molotov cocktails, clashed with police, and smashed windows. By the time it was all said and done, they had caused well over $100,000 worth of property damage. This is now being regarded as the first Battle for Berkeley. And the left won.

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The First One Hundred Days Is a Meaningless Metric

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The first one hundred days of a new president’s presidency is a media gimmick created by Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1933. I’ll skip right to the important part: It was a crock of shit then and it’s an even bigger crock of shit now. It’s an artifice meant to distract from more important things, such as the fact that the effects of policy-making often do not become evident until long after they are implemented. It took years for the deregulation of craft brewing to reap dividends and when it did Reagan’s economy took credit while Carter pounded sand. Like many (maybe most) bad ideas, NAFTA seemed like a good one at the time. The War on Drugs was supposed to usher in a utopia of peaceful streets and whole families; some forty years later it is an obvious failure built on lies. The point is, setting policy – good or bad – is a process, not an event. Roosevelt’s media gimmick is a snapshot of a bigger picture with…

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The Yiannopolous-Hitchens Comparison

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Last month liberal talk show host Bill Maher, during an interview with Milo Yiannopolous, compared the controversial right-winger to a “young, gay, alive Christopher Hitchens.” But such a comparison of Maher’s is false and does dirt to the much more thoughtful—and libertarian—Hitchens. On sexuality alone, the two differ. Although Hitchens admitted to gay relationships in the past (some of whom were with Hitchens’ hated Tories who later served in Margaret Thatcher’s cabinet), he never engaged in bashing homosexuals as does Yiannopoulos. It’s not just Hitchens’ public stances on homosexuality, endorsing gay marriage as a “form of love,” and attacking anti-sodomy laws, that frustrates any comparison with Yiannopoulos. It is that Hitchens in his time battled the kind of far right gay bashers of the Yiannopolous sort. He even argued that homosexuality was often the province of the right: “the sexual outlaw world may be anarchic, but it is also servile and deferential. It is, to put it crudely, generally right-wing.”

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Ann Coulter Backs Out From Berkeley: For Patriots, It’s Still On

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After a highly publicized ordeal involving UC Berkeley and Ann Coulter, and after the latter insisted as recently as just a few hours before the time of this writing that she would speak at Berkeley irrespectively of the fact that administrators had done all that they could to prevent her from being heard, Ann has decided to…cancel her event. “There will be no speech,” she wrote in an email to Reuters. Two groups that originally planned on sponsoring her had backed out. “I looked over my shoulder and my allies had joined the other team.” Ann added: “I have no sponsor, no lawyer, no court order. I can’t vindicate constitutional rights on my own. I was just supposed to give the speech.”

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Yiannopolous’ Tent Show

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In an example of stubbornness, courage, or suicidal tendencies, right-wing lightning rod Milo Yiannopoulos is announcing a return to the lion’s den of UC Berkeley, where previously his appearance resulted in violence by leftist students. His plan is to hold “Milo’s Free Speech Week,” which he calls a weeklong event of rallies and speeches attacking such “enemies of free speech,” as feminists, Black Lives Matter members, and the Islam religion.

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Supreme Court Reins In The Lower Courts And Yields To Congress

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Last month, in a 7-1 decision (Justice Breyer dissenting), the Supreme Court issued an order that should warm the hearts of every originalist. In the case of SCA Hygiene Products v. First Quality Baby Products the Court ruled that judges do not have the authority to change the statute of limitations as enacted by Congress. In 1952, Congress enacted 35 USC §282 which established a six-year statute of limitations in patent infringement cases. This statute allowed an inventor to recover damages for the six years prior to their filing a case. However, the courts had decided that Congress did not mean what Congress said.

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The Battle Of Berkeley: When Patriots Beat The Anti-American Left

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The tide is turning. It is nothing less than an unmitigated disgrace that hate-consumed leftist ideologues have been permitted to unleash violence upon their political opponents for at least as long as Donald Trump has been a serious contender for the presidency. There’s been an explosion of political violence in America, and it is all courtesy of leftist thugs, or “protesters,” as their sophistic ideological ilk in the media routinely describe them. It is thugs, not lawful protesters, who have spared no occasion to assault those who, in labeling them as “fascists,” “racists,” and “neo-Nazis,” they have rendered non-persons. The latest incarnation of militant leftist hatred is the so-called “black bloc,” the “antifa” (short for “anti-fascists”). These are the vermin that conceal their faces with bandanas while dressing in black. These domestic terrorists roam in packs of considerable numbers. Loud, abrasive, and obnoxious, they can be counted upon to destroy property and attack both civilians and police officers by way of a range of weaponry, from bear mace, pepper…

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Is a Communications ‘Radar Detector’ For Consumers In Order?

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In recent weeks, Americans have been treated to high-profile news stories concerning the administration of former president Barack Obama having conducted clandestine surveillance on the campaign of Donald Trump during the 2016 election cycle, the “unmasking” of innocent private citizens subsequent to this, as well as dedicated Obama operatives who remain in government service acting in an orchestrated manner to sabotage the Trump administration. Over the last few years, Americans have become aware of clandestine and illegal government surveillance that has been initiated against citizens, whether they be journalists, political organizations, elected officials, or unaffiliated individuals who have aligned themselves against the far left international socialist machine. (To be fair, the framework for all of this was put in place prior to the presidency of Barack Hussein Obama, but came into its own during the tenure this president.)

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Why The H-1B Visa Racket Should Be Abolished, Not Reformed

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Billionaire businessman Marc Cuban insists that the H-1B visa racket is a feature of the vaunted American free market. This is nonsense on stilts. It can’t go unchallenged. Another billionaire, our president, has ordered that the H-1B program be reformed. This, too, is disappointing. You’ll see why. First, let’s correct Mr. Cuban: America has not a free economy, but a mixed-economy. State and markets are intertwined. Trade, including trade in labor, is not free; it’s regulated to the hilt. If anything, the labyrinth of work visas is an example of a fascistic government-business cartel in operation. The H-1B permit, in particular, is part of that state-sponsored visa system. The primary H-1B hogs—Infosys (and another eight, sister Indian firms), Microsoft, and Intel—import labor with what are grants of government privilege. Duly, the corporations that hog H-1Bs act like incorrigibly corrupt rent-seekers. Not only do they get to replace the American worker, but they get to do so at his expense.

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Is Trump a ‘Transcendent’ President?

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Those conservatives, and particularly prominent conservative pundits, who have insisted upon second-guessing President Donald Trump’s recent decisions to unleash our military toward the objective of reestablishing America’s preeminence on the world stage utterly sicken me. It’s been well-established that Mr. Trump is not an ideological conservative, but it escapes me why even an ideological conservative would go to such lengths to criticize Trump for achieving arguably more conservative measures in 80 days than most presidents achieve in four years. On April 6, the United States launched a military strike on a Syrian airbase in response to a chemical weapons attack that had killed dozens of civilians. Even Trump’s most vociferous liberal detractors found it difficult to criticize him for ordering the strike, given the atrocious nature and scope of Syria’s act.

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Based Stickman Shows Libertarians That Bold Grassroots Leadership Is Necessary

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In a time where naked parasitic leftism is running wild, libertarians are faced with a choice. They can either stand and fight against this menace, or wave the white flag of surrender. This seems like it would be an easy choice for any lover of liberty, but if you listen to certain voices within the movement, cowardice is the most noble of options. “The left-wing combatants claim to be anarchists, and yet are furthering the state,” commentator Dan Sanchez wrote in a FEE column. “The right-wing combatants claim to be for liberty, and yet are putting liberty in danger. If these conflicts continue to escalate, no matter which side “wins,” liberty will lose.” Sanchez’s commentary is indicative of the academic, elitist, ivory tower mindset that plagues the libertarian movement. This mindset fosters passive inaction and stagnation. It has gotten especially pernicious since Ron Paul retired from public life. Isolated in his bubble, Sanchez and others like him have forgotten what the people need right now. They don’t need a…

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Facebook As Big Brother: The Liberty Conservative Gets Censored By Thought Police

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On Friday, we published an article titled ‘Cato VP Attacks Ron Paul, Calls His Ideas a “Hideous Corruption Of Libertarian Ideas”‘ written by senior contributor Alex Witoslawski. As the article was beginning to gain traction and go viral, Facebook decided to censor it—issuing temporary bans for anyone who merely shared the writing. Dozens of people have reported being censored immediately after sharing the article. Some of the error warnings suggested that malware could have been involved, but that was a deception. Rather than admitting to their practice of muzzling speech, Facebook apparently gives random error messages to baffle users and throw them off the trail. Most of the people afflicted were put out of commission for two days, unable to share links to content on the social media platform. From a strictly libertarian perspective, Facebook has the right to act in completely abhorrent and disgusting ways. Conversely, we have the right to expose the truth about this entity and work to build consumer pressure against their reprehensible policies until…

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If You Want To Make NATO Great Again, Kick Out Turkey

in Politics/World by

  President Trump insisted throughout the presidential campaign (and even after being elected) that NATO was “obsolete”, mainly focusing on the fact that many of our European allies don’t put forward the appropriate proportion of their GDP toward their defense budgets and on the claim that the transatlantic organization doesn’t do enough to combat terrorism (the latter a far less fair criticism than the former, especially given the fact that the only time the group has invoked its Article 5 mutual defense provision was to assist the United States in the wake of the September 11th attacks). President Trump recently abruptly reversed course, now saying that NATO was no longer obsolete. But Donald Trump actually was right about NATO obsolescence, although right for the wrong reasons. It’s not because we no longer need NATO as a bulwark against Russia (we do) and not because NATO is no longer useful in the age of international terrorism (it is), but it is “obsolete” because an increasingly authoritarian Turkey has become an…

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Federalists Don’t Want a New Conservative Party. We Want a Federalist Party.

in Politics by

Political ideologies are like gas prices – everybody has an idea of what they should be, but in reality they are constantly moving to reflect the priorities of the surrounding marketplace. In today’s hyperpartisan culture, trying to pinpoint someone’s ideological niche seems of utmost importance. Most folks act like their property value depends on whether the new neighbors’ car sports a “coexist” bumper sticker or an NRA decal. But as Trump’s brand of moderate populism permeates the GOP and Bernie Sanders takes the reins of the Democrat rebuild, it’s apparent that the goalposts are moving again.

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The Trump Doctrine Takes Shape

in History/Politics by
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The concept of Presidential Doctrine dates back to when James Monroe adopted a posture of anti-European colonialism in the western hemisphere. Since that time many presidents have come and gone without leaving a signature stamp on the attitude and behavior of our nation vis a vis foreign policy though many have at most sought to merely modify pre-existing positions. Theodore Roosevelt took Monroe’s doctrine and mutated it into the Roosevelt Corollary which would later be reversed by his fifth cousin, Franklin Roosevelt who adopted a Good Neighbor policy toward those nations in the Central and South America. In relatively short time, the neocon wing of the Republican Party hijacked our government and set about reinvigorating the interventionist ambitions of Teddy Roosevelt’s Big Stick Diplomacy. Under Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, America ceased speaking softly and carrying a big stick; it raised its voice and started actively using the stick in places like Grenada and Panama and various other Latin countries that failed to fall in line with…

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No Free Speech For Fascists: The Selective Civil Liberties Of The Pomona College Left

in Politics by

In a legal powwow with their lawyers, Hollywood Communists, forever known as “The Hollywood Ten,” who were summoned by Congress to testify about their political affiliations in 1947, were given the hypothetical question about freedom of expression for all by their attorneys. When asked if they believed in freedom of speech for Communists, the immediate answer from all was a resounding “yes.” Some of the group even supported the next hypothetical question of whether “fascists” were eligible for the same free speech protections. But John Howard Lawson, the uber-sectarian head of the Hollywood Party, advised otherwise, saying, “The answer is that you do not believe in freedom of expression for fascists,” only Communists because what we “say is true,” and what the fascists say “is a lie.” And off Lawson went to testify before Congress in which he defended freedom of expression for all.

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Antifa Cowards Meet Their Match

in Politics by
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Newton’s Third Law of physics states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Though commonly understood to apply to physical interactions between objects in action, this law is as true in boxing and baseball as it is in politics. Midterm elections are often a down-ballot repudiation of a president and ruling party’s policy initiatives. This accounts for the Democratic Party’s drubbings in 2010 and 2014. It accounts for the humiliating dressing down they received at the hands of the forgotten men and women of the American electorate in November of last year. It accounts for the vehement violence perpetrated by the Antifa pawns of George Soros and other more ambiguous movers and shakers in the elite echelons of the “progressive” power structure. We got hints of liberal vitriol-in-action during the election campaign when paid provocateurs invaded Trump rallies and attacked their peaceful counterparts. At the inauguration, we saw more as masked thugs destroyed storefronts and set fires and assaulted anyone who dared stand up to…

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Texas Voter ID Misruling

in Law/Politics by

Federal judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos – on a mission to “persist” perhaps – ruled last week that Texas’ voter ID law not only discriminates against minorities and/or the poor and/or the “disenfranchised” – but does so intentionally. That the judge was appointed by former President Barack Obama probably has nothing at all to do with her myopic legal views or her contrived and misguided ruling. It’s unfortunate that ideologically driven judicial rulings attempting to satisfy a political agenda continue to remain obstructions to justice and the expressed will of the people. For the past ten years, voters elected Republicans to both houses of the Texas Legislature and U.S. Congress by large margins as the means of achieving a very specific set of policy ideas and agenda items – one of which was implementing voter ID at the ballot box. Those legislators have gone to Austin and Washington, D.C. as representatives of the people who elected them and who hold them to their promises to carry out the badly needed reforms to…

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Teaching The Americans Democratic Procedure: Russian Dissident Masha Gessen

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Russian dissidents are usually proponents of American-style libertarianism. Lech Walesa loved Ronald Reagan, as did prisoners in Gulags, who would risk it all and cheer whenever the guards would counter-productively broadcast Reagan speeches. Having been subjected to big government run amok in Russia, dissidents who immigrate to the United States appreciate what is exceptional about American society. The same can be said of Masha Gessen, a former Russian dissident and writer-in-residence at Oberlin College. In a period where other anti-Trump activists refuse to consider the arguments of the other side and seek to deny those “fascists” the right to express pro-Trump sentiments, Gessen has a libertarian tinge.

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Trump, The MOAB, & a Red Line Against ISIS

in Politics/World by

In 2012, President Obama laid down his now-infamous “red line” speech against Bashar al-Assad, warning that the use of chemical weapons by Syria would result in “enormous consequences” from the United States – consequences that America proved both utterly unwilling and unable to follow through on when Assad inevitably used chemical weapons against rebel forces near Damascus in 2013, killing many hundreds of civilians, including over a hundred children. But when Assad decided to wantonly use chemical weapons again in 2017 there was a new President in the White House, and, 59 Tomahawk cruise missile strikes against Al Shayrat airbase later, the message was sent (“Don’t gas babies…”) and a former president’s red line was finally enforced by his successor (albeit about four years after the fact). But it now seems that President Trump has laid down his own “red line” – this one against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). But unlike his predecessor, he seems willing to swiftly respond to provocation, as indicated by the…

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Mixing Business With Politics

in Politics by

A good balance of business and pleasure is good for companies. It improves morale and helps reduce employee burnout. However, companies that have chosen to mix business with politics have, in most cases, experienced an adverse effect. It’s common knowledge that employees shouldn’t discuss politics when they’re on the clock. In attempts to create a safe and respectful corporate environment, human resources discourage such discussions, as not everyone shares the same political ideology. Which begs the question – why do some U.S. companies promote their political affiliations or stances on certain issues? If history is a past predictor of future events, why would any CEO risk their company’s reputation by affiliating themselves with a specific political party? Knowing the United States is nearly split between republicans and democrats, why would any business gamble on aligning their company with politics, as they’re sure to lose customers who oppose the stance a business should take? Businesses are learning that when they integrate politics within their corporate structure, it poses a great…

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Princess Ivanka

in Politics by

Since the president started strafing Syria, it has become evident that Trump’s favorite offspring needs to be booted from the People’s House. The British press, more irreverent than ours, seconded the broad consensus that Ivanka had nagged daddy into doing it. For the kids: the First Daughter was, purportedly, devastated by the (unauthenticated) images of a suspected gas attack in Syria. Brother Eric Trump confirmed it: “Sure, Ivanka influenced the Syria strike decision.” White House Spokesman Sean Spicer didn’t deny it. Eric had headed back to the Trump Organization, as he promised during the campaign. Ivanka just wouldn’t go. Who could fail to notice that the First Daughter, a cloistered, somewhat provincial American princess, has been elevated inappropriately in the White House, while First Lady Melania, a cosmopolitan steel magnolia, has been marginalized?

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Putin Shows Heroic Leadership As Trump Is Cucked By Neocons In Syria

in Politics/World by

Donald Trump faced the first true test of his Presidency this past week, and failed abysmally. After a chemical attack in Syria that was attributed without any real evidence to President Bashir al-Assad, Trump threw his relatively non-interventionist stance in the trash immediately to appease the neocons and other Washington D.C. swamp rats, launching airstrikes against the Syrian government. While Trump faltered, a truly masculine leader with big hands reacted like a professional. Vladimir Putin refused to budge to the neocon war machine and throw Assad under the bus at their behest. He refused to feed into the globalist propaganda narratives pushing the world toward conflict. He didn’t care that the western media was making him or Assad out to be bogeymen. Putin urged for restraint while Trump was rushing to war. He stood strong under the pressure while Trump whimpered. Putin told Israeli Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu that “it was unacceptable to make groundless accusations against anyone without conducting a detailed and unbiased investigation.”

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Compassion Is Not a Cause For War

in Politics/World by

President Trump ordered airstrikes against Syrian airfields after claiming that Assad′s military was responsible for sarin gas attacks against civilian targets. Even if Assad gave the order, compassion for Syrian civilians is a poor reason to bomb Syria. The only time the US should use military force is to protect the US or to protect an ally. Often in spite of the President′s best intentions and the military′s best efforts, bad things happen with our missiles. Targets are often chosen based on faulty intel and missiles stray off course because of faulty guidance systems. Even though the Russians were told in advance of the missile strikes, and even though the Russians probably warned Assad′s men of the attack, at least seven people died as a result of the strikes. Future attacks will likely yield even more fatalities.

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Was President Trump’s Ryancare Support a Power Play Against Speaker Ryan?

in Politics by

Since before the legislation known as “Obamacare” was even passed, Republicans have vowed to oppose the Democratic Party’s legislative attempts to take on healthcare. Since passage, it has been one of the few topics most Republicans could agree on to some degree. When opposing former President Barack Obama’s re-election and then-former-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Republicans pushed the message of repealing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Given all the fiery and loud rhetoric that has remained consistent over the years, many expected more out of a Republican Party that controls both chambers of Congress and the White House. With control of Congress, the party has the votes to put forth an ambitious plan to restore the free markets and back the government out of the healthcare industry. It is something that President Trump would undoubtedly sign.

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