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Hands Off My Healthcare: Opposition To Obamacare, Explained.

in Economics/Law/Politics by

Unless you’re Bill Belichick, you may have heard a thing or two about the impending repeal of The Affordable Care Act on Snapface or Instachat. Actually, you’ve probably heard quite a lot. From Esquire stating 30 million people lost their healthcare overnight, to countless pithy tweets and Facebook quotes about the evils of the Republicans for wanting to deny coverage to the American people. The problem is that this isn’t true. The Affordable Care Act has NOT been repealed. Nor have any provisions been dismantled. The infamous late-night vote you surely read about was to authorize congress to modify Obamacare’s funding down the line – setting the path for a repeal. Democrats attempted to attach various amendments, locking the republicans into keeping certain provisions during this process, which were shot down. That does not mean they won’t be kept. It means they didn’t lock themselves in before they had a chance to modify the bill. Not a single thing about Obamacare has been changed. Any source that fails to mention this information is…

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Mickey Mouse Belongs To The People And Not To The Disney Company

in Culture/Law/Politics by

Please explain to me why Walt Disney is able to maintain a copyright on Mickey Mouse for 95 years while the companies discovering the drugs that heal our bodies are only able to maintain their patents for seventeen years? Every day big pharmaceutical companies are chastised for making large profits. There is not the same outrage about Disney charging $90 for a shirt that should cost $20. Why is Disney allowed to make obscene profits at the hands of the American people and not be a villain? The United States Constitution gave Congress the power to “promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries”. In 1790, the first Congress passed the very first Patent Act and the very first Copyright Act. Both of these acts granted to their creator the exclusive right for fourteen years. Sometime during the Trump administration, there will be a move to amend the copyright law. Disney…

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Taxation, Regulation: Not Reasons To Legalize Pot

in Culture/Economics/Law/Politics by

In the marijuana legalization debate, two talking points are often utilized: taxation and regulation. These are good arguments from a liberal perspective, but quite problematic in a conservative or libertarian context. The basis for justifying the legalization of marijuana is simple. Consenting adults should be allowed to choose what to put in their bodies, whether or not it’s harmful, so long as there are no externalities. This is the only legitimate and principled basis for legalization.

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The Solution To Firearmphobia: Education

in Culture/Law/Politics by

On a variety of issues ranging from same-sex marriage to transgenderism to Islam, the Left has called for a more informed and accepting public. On one issue, however, it seems to benefit them to keep the public in the dark: firearms and the second amendment. Passing modern gun-control schemes such as an ‘assault weapons’ ban and a ban on ‘high capacity’ magazines intrinsically requires an ignorant public. The reason why so many folks are anti-gun is simply because a large swath of the general population doesn’t really know all that much about guns. With only about 1/3 of Americans owning a firearm, the rest don’t have much of a reason to learn about guns, much less the laws surrounding them.

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Cold War’s Supreme Court

in History/Law by

Cold War scholar Kai Bird once stated that the ultimate sin of McCarthyism was that it did not take into account context. By this he meant that Joe McCarthy was ignoring the defensible, if wrong-headed reasons people became communists in the Great Depression. After all, capitalism seemed to be failing, the Russian 5 year plan seemed to be an economic success, and fascism, seemingly opposed solely by the Soviet Union, was on the rise. For concerned citizens, it appeared that only the Communists were doing anything to fight Adolf Hitler and the Great Depression. But this plea for context has its limits; particularly when the topic is the domestic Cold War of the early 1950s. For the left today, the second Red Scare was either the result of either or both: America plunging into fascism, or a desire to keep the full employment war economy of World War II going. No matter which argument was adopted — and usually they are conjoined — a conspiracy of right-wing extremists populated…

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If Only The Rights Of Everyday Americans Mattered As Much As Hillary Clinton’s

in Law/Politics by

If there’s one thing that Hillary Clinton allies and supporters established last year, it’s that she was the victim of the year. Nobody in the world has been more targeted and more oppressed than her. Conservative opponents are relentlessly trying to stop a former Secretary of State who before that was a United States Senator and First Lady. To these individuals, her record speaks for itself. She’s established her record. Clinton is above us all. It is for this reason the rules do not apply to her. Chelsea Manning is sitting in prison after releasing classified information to whistleblower website Wikileaks. Before her trial, she was subject to harsh treatment that some have described as torture. The former Army Private First Class did not do this out of reckless negligence or severe incompetence. She did not do it out of spite towards the military or government, nor did she do it to harm the nation.

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Why You Should Support A Ban On Late-Term Abortions

in Law/Philosophy by

The ongoing debate on abortion is one of the most divisive issues in the political sphere, and it has attracted increased attention over this election cycle. It has become a more pressing issue as the public is uncertain about how abortion rights will change when President-elect Trump takes office. His presidency is expected to usher in a more conservative stance on abortion, as shown by Vice President-elect Pence’s pro-life position and Trump’s promise that “the justices that I am going to appoint will be pro-life.” The public is aware of the gravity of this matter, as 45% of Americans stated that it is important to them that future Supreme Court nominees share their views on abortion. The pro-choice vs. pro-life divide continues to deepen as each side resists compromise, fearing that their opposition will take advantage of any settlement. While many people have become absorbed in abortion as a political issue, they forget about the moral underpinnings that make it such a factious topic. This disparity can be seen in…

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Donald Trump Appoints Libertarian To Key White House Position

in Law/Politics by

Donald Trump has appointed Don McGahn, a former member of the Federal Election Commission and the Trump campaign’s counsel, as the White House Counsel. The White House Counsel advises the President on all legal issues surrounding the administration.

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An Open Letter To Protesters Who Block Traffic

in Law/Politics by

Dear Protesters, I totally get why you are blocking traffic. You want everyone else to be as mad as you are. You accept the risk that you might be run over or physically attacked because you believe in your cause. People might be late for work, but this draws attention to your grievances. Blocking traffic might be illegal, but at least nobody is getting hurt, right? Would you still stand in the way if you saw an ambulance with its lights and siren on? I hope you would at least let traffic through in a life or death situation. But here are a couple of things you need to know about ambulances. When an ambulance is transporting a patient to the ER, most of the time it does so with the siren turned off. The patient still needs to get to the hospital quickly, but high speeds, flashing lights, and loud noises can be traumatizing. Sirens are mostly only used when the ambulance is en route to a scene,…

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No Exceptions: All Illegal Aliens Must Be Physically Removed

in Law/Politics by

After every presidential election, the idea of the president’s “electoral mandate” becomes a hot topic of discussion. The newly elected president, by virtue of his election, is thought to have received a “mandate” from the American people to pursue his policy agenda. On November 8, the American people elected Donald Trump and gave him a clear mandate to address the following issues: trade, Obamacare, and most importantly, immigration.

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Hillary’s “Get Out Of Jail Free” Cards

in Law/Politics by

Donald Trump openly talked about sending Hillary to prison while on stage with her during a debate. Many of us would like to see Hillary Clinton held accountable for her past actions. And yet a lot of leftists who wanted George W. Bush tried for war crimes have suddenly decided that arresting former government officials isn’t always pragmatic. The former Secretary of State and presidential candidate still has a number of options left to stay out of Club Fed. Obama could pardon her.  A pardon would end all discussion of Mrs. Clinton serving time for Emailgate, and Obama has until January 20th to decide if that’s what he wants to do. Like Richard Nixon, Hillary doesn’t even need to be indicted in order to receive a blanket pardon for anything she did or may have done while serving as Secretary of State. The drawback is that accepting the pardon could be seen as an admission of guilt, and therefore tarnish her legacy. Yet there are many historical figures who have…

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1st Amendment Does Not Give Protestors The Right To Protest

in Law/Politics by

Across this nation, thousands of individuals are gathering together to exercise their “supposed” First Amendment right of Freedom of Speech. These protestors are expressing their outrage that Donald Trump was elected as the President of the United States of America. The problem is that these protestors are disrupting the lives of those who live in the area of the protests. While they may have a First Amendment right to speech, that right ends when their speech interferes with the reasonable restrictions established by laws. The Supreme Court does allow cities to restrict Free Speech on the grounds of reasonable Time, Place, and Manner. See Grayned v. The City of Rockford (1972). I guarantee you that none of these protestors have gone to the city and obtained a permit to block traffic in the recent protests. If you wanted to hold a parade tomorrow morning to celebrate Donald Trump’s victory, your permit would most likely be granted as long as all the proper procedures were followed that the city has…

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What Would An Un-elected White House Look Like?

in Law/Politics by

This article is a follow-up to my piece about the possibility of an Electoral College tie, available here. We haven’t had a non-partisan White House since before there was a White House. George Washington didn’t affiliate with any political party, though his policies and appointments leaned somewhat to the Federalist end of the spectrum. By the time John Adams moved into the White House during his only term in office, the country was well established on the two-party path on which it has stayed to this day. This is why it’s so baffling to ask ourselves what it would look like to live in a country with a President elected independently of any party, and either a Republican House and Senate, or a Republican House and a Democratic Senate. Either way, it would raise very serious questions about the institution of the Presidency, the Constitution, and its interaction with the other organs of our government. First off, if we are considering a presidency that begins with a tie in…

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We Can No Longer Write Off An Electoral College Tie

in Law/Politics by

It’s not likely. We’ve been told our whole lives it’s not possible. But here we are, a week from the general election, and we are the closest we have been in our lifetimes to a Twelfth Amendment crisis. The two least popular major party nominees that anyone seems to remember continue their race to the bottom of the country’s expectations. A newly reopened FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails has sent her campaign spiraling from an unpopular but safe victory into last-minute suspense. Donald Trump is surging back to safety in red states where Clinton was threatening decades of Republican control. And by default, he is surging in swing states, too. Nevada, Arizona, Florida, Ohio, Iowa, and North Carolina are within striking distance. Meanwhile, there’s a storm of unexpected proportions sweeping one of this country’s largest, best organized, and best funded religious minorities. Independent candidate Evan McMullin is defying all expectations by blowing decades-old third parties out of the water in his sudden surge to the top of the…

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The Rule Of Law: Force When It Suits Me

in Law/Politics by

First, I had to pick myself up from the floor from laughing. Second, I started seeing the flood of gloating comments and “I told you so’s.” It turns out Hillary Clinton’s emails did have some evidence that would sink her ambitions and, this just in: the only way for the FBI to find it amid all the wiped servers was on the phone they confiscated from Anthony Weiner. Swarms of the same people who said the rule of law is dead when the first FBI investigation didn’t recommend pressing charges are now back to say that justice will be served at last. And maybe it will. Maybe Hillary will go to prison, and Vice President-Elect Tim Kaine will have to step up between then and January 20, as per Amendment XX, Section 3 of the Constitution. But personally, I doubt it. I doubt it for the same reason I doubt Donald Trump will face any serious repercussions for what he may or may not have done to so many…

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Government Won’t Let Disabled Child Bring Service Dog To School

in Law/Politics by

Thank you, government, for giving us all things so good and beautiful. Without you, there would be riots and chaos in the street, or possibly even disabled middle school girls bringing their service dogs to school with them. This just in from Napoleon, Michigan. Brent and Stacy Fry are suing their local school district because their daughter, known as F.E. in litigation documents to protect her identity, just isn’t getting anywhere by asking politely. She was born with cerebral palsy and relies heavily on her service dog, Wonder, to get around her home and school. Unfortunately for the Frys, the local school district doesn’t allow dogs. Not even a loyal service companion like Wonder, on whom F.E. has relied since the age of five for everything from help opening doors to getting around the hallways. After an initial denial of F.E.’s request and a protracted back-and-forth, the school district allowed Wonder to accompany F.E. to school on a “trial basis” with certain restrictions. For example, Wonder could come to…

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Why Short-Sighted Social Conservatism Is Costing Us North Carolina

in Law/Politics by

The electoral map is looking pretty blue this year, but one case study looks even more interesting than the others. Like most southern states, North Carolina has a long history with blue dog Democrats at the state and local level and reliable Republican voting patterns at the federal level. Nothing too radical there, just a case in point of an older, conservative Democratic Party whose fading echoes can still be heard from the other side of the sixties. I’m referring to something far more unique this year. This year, North Carolina may be the only state in which Republicans at the state level fare better than Donald Trump at the national level. As of this writing, Clinton has pulled ahead of Trump in the Tar Heel State but remains within the margin of error at 2.6 percent ahead. Pat McCrory has trailed in the polls throughout the general election cycle, generally behind Donald Trump, though both races are too close to call at the moment. Is there really a…

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Does The Pro-Life Movement Have a Future?

in Law/Politics by

From the moment Roe v. Wade came down from the gavel of the nine gods to the lives of our unworthy peasantry, social conservatives and the religious right have been debating tactics to achieve the impossible: Overturning a 7 to 2 Supreme Court decision. It’s a task not many activist movements have been able to pull off. First, the mantra was appointing new justices to overturn it. Lawyers and strategists tried to find a way for Congress and the President to go around it. Amending the Constitution was placed on the table. How was the pro-life movement going to push back against the progressive achievements of the Warren-Burger Court in a world where federal judges serve for life? The pro-life movement, since 1973, has essentially taken a strategy of a little of everything. Ronald Reagan and both Bushes were propelled to the Republican nomination with the full weight of the evangelical political machine. Evangelist superstars like Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell called down fire and brimstone on the left…

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