Author

Alice Salles

Alice Salles has 24 articles published.

Alice Salles
Born and raised in Brazil, Alice always knew America was her home. From the moment she first lived in the United States as a 14-year-old up until now, she has never stopped fighting to make it freer. She lives in Compton, California and writes for The Advocates for Self-Government and Anti-Media.

Clinton’s Curtain Call Continues: Influence Peddling Scheme Goes Bust

in Politics by

The curtain fell on former First Lady Hillary Clinton’s political career. And with it, so did the Clinton Global Initiative. Not a surprising development for anyone who has paid attention to her presidential campaign and the scandals involving her influence paddling schemes. According to the New York Observer and Fox, CGI is closing its main New York office, laying off 22 people. But why?

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Obama Failures Demand Universal Outrage, But Few Dare Speak Up

in Politics by

The country seems to be ready to burst into a civil war. But not over the 44th President of the United States and his legacy of war, abuse of power, and irresponsible health policies. Instead, media outlets seem to suggest that people are sick and tired of “Russian interference,” seeing President-elect Donald Trump as a foreign threat, ready to trigger the dawn of a new fascist regime. From concentration camps to the end of freedom of speech, Trump has been accused of everything under the sun. But especially, he has been accused of standing for particular policies that Barack Obama himself implemented — and with gusto. Where have these media outlets been these last eight years? Have they not noticed Obama’s unconstitutional embrace of drone warfare? Or have they missed out on his bending of engagement rules, effectively allowing more civilians to be killed as a result of the war on ISIS? Perhaps, they slept through his decision to expand — not curtail — the growth of the U.S.…

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Snowflake Generation: It’s Not Political Until It’s Personal

in Politics by

“There’s too much ‘presentism’ right now.” Or so says Camille Paglia, the fearless academic whose views on biology and modern culture can be called anything but trendy. Ignoring the realities of man and man’s history has been a feature in modern academia. A problem for students who are willing to engage in honest and open discussions about everything from sex to politics. But to young adults whose personal history of apathy can be traced back to their parents’ indifference to the wisdom of their elders, going off into the big, wild world for college means moving from mom and dad’s into auntie’s. In other words, college, or the world of academia, is but an extension of the bubble developed early and well-maintained through the years by parents.

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Pretense Of Knowledge: The Democrats’ Fatal Conceit

in Politics by
sad clinton electors

Accepting the Nobel prize in Economic Sciences, late Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek admitted that, as a profession, economists “have made a mess of things.” He was referring to the modern economist’s reliance on a pretense of knowledge. Believing economics is a physical science and that outcomes can be predicted with precision, these economists often bet on false or spotty information. The results are seldom what’s expected, and the ramifications of these policies are often destructive. Recently, the Daily Mail reported, Democrats were caught leading the effort to swing Electoral College voters away from President-elect Donald Trump in a very personal way. “Internal calls and emails reveal leaders of last-ditch effort to swing Electoral College [voters] … communicated with [Hillary] Clinton campaign officials,” the publication claimed, all while Democratic leaders like campaign chair John Podesta “didn’t explicitly endorse efforts.” Some of these Democratic leaders included senior Clinton advisors such as Jennifer Palmieri, the communications director for the Clinton campaign. Despite the hard work, Clinton ended up losing more Electoral College votes…

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Buried In Paperwork, Doctors Have No Time For Patients

in Politics by
physicians, doctors, healthcare, Obamacare, patient

As the saying goes, one stitch in time saves nine. But while physicians know this to be true, they often run out of time — and patience — to focus on their patients. Unfortunately, that’s frequently due to bureaucracy. At least that’s what this new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine has taught us. Despite having long complained about the bureaucratization of their craft, physicians seem to be losing their war against the regulatory machine. Spending so much time doing paperwork is leaving the doctor very little time to focus on what matters: The patient’s health. Instead of helping individuals recover from their ailments, these doctors feel their hands are tied. After all, if the doctor is unable to meet the demand imposed by government requirements, he’ll be kept from work. Hoping to remain in the profession, he chooses to accept his burden. But as more regulations are passed, the cost of both doing business and having access to care continues to increase.

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Progressives As The New Puritans

in Philosophy/Politics by
Purtian, progressive

In Puritan America, only church members were allowed to vote in political elections. In progressive America, talking heads want the executive branch represented only by Democrats. To those willing to participate in the political aspect of their communities at the time, adhering to pure doctrine was the only way in. And candidates were only accepted into the congregation once the minister and elders were satisfied with their conduct. Even after being made a part of the church, members would still be subject to expulsion over any conduct deviations, forcing residents to live in fear and under only one doctrine. To Puritans, their philosophy and the state was one, the same approach embraced by modern progressives. Having a way with words often helps progressives to persuade their prey. By calling everything they support “progressive” and everything they do not support “reactionary” or antidemocratic, progressives are able to persuade a great number of gullible voters. As loyalists vote to have their liberties taken away, they are led to believe they made…

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‘Hate Spaces’: The Need For Real Choice In Education

in Politics by
education, graduation, choice

During a book-signing event, English author and self-styled atheist Philip Pullman was asked to comment on the “shocking” title of his then-new book: “The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ.” “Yes,” Pullman answered, “it’s a shocking thing to say. But no one has the right to live without being shocked. No one has the right to spend their life without being offended,” he concluded. The sentiment shared by Pullman is correct because government-sponsored protection from offensive speech should be seen as nothing but an immoral act. But in this case, the offended party could choose not to buy his book, thus avoiding the triggering event. What the offended party cannot do, however, is to keep Pullman or the publisher from writing and publishing offensive material. They are, after all, private entities, and individuals have a right to live life as they see fit, using private property as their means. Living in isolation, away from others who do not share the same convictions or other particular traits, is a choice.…

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Arrogance, a Trademark Of The Clinton Camp

in Politics by

Politico’s dossier on how Hillary Clinton lost Michigan to President-elect Donald Trump is complete with anecdotes from the grassroots, who often felt that the top Democrat and her minions couldn’t care less about them. Arrogance, it seems, was a trademark of the Clinton campaign. And the consequence of this flagrant disregard for the base was the best outcome the presidential campaign of an imperious candidate could get: Defeat. Leaving aside the attention this now widely known factor has received due to Politico’s coverage, it’s incredible to think that, to many, the Clinton camp’s arrogant streak was never noticeable. And even if it had been, it wouldn’t have made a difference. The odds — they would hit back — are in her favor. After all, she’s a Clinton. A career politician. A well-established Democrat. Who’s Trump? Just a TV loudmouth.

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Turning Health Into a ‘Right’ Makes Open Access Impossible

in Politics by
healthcare, obamacare

Unlike popular belief, direct democracy started long before politicians associated with the military wing of Brazilian politics lost its battle over the hearts and souls of locals. But in the late 1980’s, the last vestiges of military rule had been wiped out. But not their policies of hyperinflation. But as a new constitution was drafted, certain positive rights were added to the final document, prompting “public health” to play an important role in the building of a new nation. “Health is a right of all and an obligation of the State,” the documented guaranteed. By late 1990, a law had been added to the books, prompting the launch of Brazil’s “Unique Health System,” or SUS in Portuguese. As a child born into a family of doctors and healthcare providers, I remember the conversations around the dinner table. The worried tones and the discussion revolving around the growing demand for health service providers and the government’s chronic lack of understanding of the medical profession. In the beginning of his career,…

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Joy Behar Is Free To Hate On Trump, So Why Can’t Women Hate Clinton?

in Culture by
the view, free speech, trump

On Friday, “The View” host and comedian Joy Behar asked co-hosts why does she “have to be so nice” about President-elect Donald Trump. “If [Republicans] didn’t like Obama, it was about his politics,” she added. “[Trump] is about what he said,” and because of that, Joy vowed to be “the thorn in his side as long as I breathe.” So far, so good. After all, don’t we all take pride in the fact we can disagree (somewhat) freely in the United States? The problem is that as the marriage between special interests and state power players remains in place, outlets responsible for the dissemination of news and entertainment are also turning into platforms ripe for censorship. As major news organizations whose staffs are politically aligned with the left sell commentary as factual news, it’s increasingly difficult for many to voice their opinions against a particular candidate or even a policy without facing some backlash.

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The Individualist Nature Of Anne Sexton’s ‘Live Or Die’

in Culture by
anne sexton, live

Traditionally, the word individualism was associated with a philosophy that contends that individuals are free, therefore granted with the ability to choose their goals and the path they shall take to meet these goals. Man, by nature, is one. Being coerced into acting according to what a group of men see as a fitting goal goes against the traditional notion of individualism. Social norms under these circumstances are mere suggestions as the individual, and only he is the owner of his destiny. But because men act with their goals in mind, they often discover that living in society while pursuing one’s own goals means cooperating with other individuals who are also pursuing their own agendas. In societies where individualism is king, individuals are more likely to cooperate freely and peacefully, often refusing the coercive hand of a power figure. Over time, the idea of individualism became infamous, as the capitalism versus communism battle put the ideas of individualism in direct opposition to collectivism. With the demonization and government-sponsored crackdown…

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Trump As Antidote To Partisan Favoritism

in Politics by

In America, a song by The Strokes’ lead singer Julian Casablancas explains, “cities come together to hate each other in the name of sport.” In politics, the sentiment is very similar — if not identical. Too often, people who identify either as conservative or liberal will bring up examples of politicians involved in wrongdoing that should not be ignored by their supporters. In response, political enemies will claim ignorance while on other occasions, they will flat-out deny any wrongdoing claim. It’s common to see these folks living in denial throughout their pet politician’s full term, ignoring calls for justice even as the number of victims grows at staggering rates. Under President Barack Obama, for instance, most of those on the left chose to ignore their president’s excruciating war on due process. Not that he deserves to be called the inventor of these tactics, per se, but he surely perfected it. As Obama now readies to leave, we can safely say his legacy is one of murder by drone, putting…

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‘Economics Is Hard’: Groupthink Is Why We’re In Such Bad Shape

in Economics by
economics, hands, politics

In Principles of Economics, Carl Menger corrected the theoretical mistakes made by the old classical school. At the time, the founder of the Austrian School of economics seemed to want to make economics accessible to everyday people, which may explain why he exemplified the nature of economic value in his book, making sure readers understood that economics revolve around the actions of individuals. Described by many as “the best introduction to economic logic ever written,” Menger’s Principles inspired young economists like Ludwig von Mises to explore the populist nature of economics in an attempt to make the case that economics was for everyone, and that practical knowledge of economics can help even the most uneducated among us to prosper. Despite the honorable efforts and the exponential growth of influence the Austrian School of economics has exerted over the years, the reality is that, for most individuals around the globe, economics is hard.

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Obama’s Audacity On Dope: A Primer On Cowardice

in Politics by

President Barack Obama might be on his way out, but the media’s relentless favoritism remains unchecked. In a recent interview for Rolling Stone, exiting Commander in Chief Obama told reporters he believes current federal marijuana laws are “untenable.” Adding that, while he has always stood by the notion that substance abuse should always be discouraged, he also believes that “treating this as a public-health issue, the same way we do with cigarettes or alcohol, is the much smarter way to deal with it.” Despite the friendly veneer and the positive response, news outlets have, for the most part, ignored the obvious problem with Obama’s friendly comments on marijuana legalization. Despite his frequent pro-legalization remarks, President Obama’s own administration turned down the opportunity to reschedule the substance in recent months. At the time, the Drug Enforcement Administration justified its position by claiming that it does not see a medical value in any strains of marijuana and yet, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the assignee in…

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Populism Always Wins: Why Libertarians Must Take Notice

in Politics by
libertarian populism

Populism, the Austrian economist and academic vice president of the Mises Institute Joseph Salerno wrote, is nothing by a strategy. It may be applied by individuals advancing both left- and right-wing ideologies, but it is seldom used by those with the right ideas. Due to its historic connection to ideologies that led to war, mass murder, and economic collapse, however, populism has been erroneously associated with bad politics. Regardless of political preferences, one thing is true: Whenever embraced by charismatic leaders, the populist approach is often the winner, whether it’s used to sell radical left-wing causes under leaders like Hugo Chávez or Republican candidates such as President-elect Donald Trump. But when it comes to libertarian populism — another breed of populism that has also managed to obtain a great deal of attention in recent history — those who could actually benefit from the popular approach often shrug.

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Scrounging For Respect In Soviet America

in Culture/Politics by
DMV

In his Netflix special, famed comedian Dana Carvey uses a simple analogy to explain the main difference between free market capitalism and socialism. “To me,” the former Saturday Night Live star launched, “capitalism is an Apple store.” But socialism, he continues, “is the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) … [where] sweaty, pissed off workers … can’t get fired.” What’s worse, Carvey added, is that “they laugh at you … ha, ha, ha ha … ‘you got the wrong line you f***ing idiot’.” Perhaps unbeknownst to the comedian, this analogy may also help to describe a sentiment shared by any American or resident whose life was forever changed by the hand of government. Respect for the individual and his needs and desires, Carvey’s bit seems to suggest, is an ideal that may only exist in an environment unblemished by bureaucracy. And he’s right. The idea the individual is sovereign and retains the sole ownership of his life is a farfetched fantasy to the bureaucrat. Instead, the average faithful and inept…

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Don’t Want a ‘Muslim Registry?’ Abolish The Census

in History/Politics by
Japanese internment camps, census, bureau, muslim registry

People on the Internet have lost all but one of their collective screws this past week. Again. As President-elect Donald Trump met with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach — a potential pick for the head Department of Homeland Security — the Internet lit up with the leaked contents of their meeting, triggering another round of talks concerning a possible “national registry” of Americans or immigrants who subscribe to Islam. While Kobach’s plan involves the George W. Bush-era National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS) — a system that remained in place under President Barack Obama until 2011 (only to be replaced with a more comprehensive program) — few caught up to the fact NSEERS only involves the collection and crosschecking of data pertaining to immigrants coming to the United States from Muslim-majority countries. But as news sources ran with the story that Trump could eventually turn this into a registry of American Muslims and immigrants already living in the country, the President-elect’s spokesman Jason Miller reassured the public that no,…

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Tulsi Gabbard For Trump Administration? Why The Right Should Cheer

in Politics by
Tulsi Gabbard, Trump, foreign policy

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) — the first Hindu member of the U.S. House of Representatives — is known for standing for principles over party loyalty. A quality lacking in most of her colleagues. The former Army veteran who spent 12 months in Iraq serving as specialist with a 29th Support Battalion medical company, is a native of Leloaloa, American Samoa. At age three, however, Gabbard’s family moved to Hawaii. According to rumors, Gabbard could be under consideration for a post at the Defense Department, State Department, or United Nations. During a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump in New York City, Gabbard told the public in a statement, the two discussed foreign policy, a subject which often puts Gabbard and her party at odds.

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Why America Should Refuse To Be Like Germany

in Culture by
Free Speech Hate Speech

The fine line between protest and violence has been repeatedly crossed these past days. Despite the hostility, few of those who feel legitimately threatened seem to  be pressuring the government — or even private organizations — to monitor the Internet for “hate” or threatening speech. On the other hand, many electors feeling left out of the process due to their candidate’s loss have used the Internet to urge others to pay attention to a surge in attacks against minorities in the wake of Donald Trump’s presidential win, despite the fact several instances of “Trump inspired” aggression or vandalism have mostly turned out to be fabricated. But in contemporary times, these discrepancies matter as much as President Barack Obama’s record-breaking war on the Muslim world. As social media companies are pressured to “do something,” Facebook and Twitter launch a war against “fake news” and offensive content. And while in America, this campaign has just begun to scare social media users, in Germany, companies like Facebook might soon be held criminally…

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Slammer For Clapper? Retiring Intelligence Chief May Belong In Jail

in Politics by
Clapper

The current Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper told a House Intelligence Committee hearing he had resigned. “I submitted my letter of resignation last night,” the scorned former lieutenant general told Congressmen Thursday, “[and it] felt pretty good,” he concluded. While the L.A. Times confirms Clapper had long pledged to retire at the end of the year, the public, as well as privacy advocates across the country, have long wondered whether lies regarding the U.S. government’s mass surveillance programs would ever come back to haunt him. Now, as Clapper has only 64 more days until the end of his term and President-elect Donald Trump has the opportunity to build his own network of intelligence leaders, we know perjury claims may never catch up to him after all.

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Remember When The Media Sold Us The Iraq WMD Lies? It’s Happening Again

in History/Politics by

Months before President George W. Bush’s speech on September 11, 2002, the New York Times reported at the time, White House officials confirmed the Bush administration had already been “[planning its Iraq strategy] long before President Bush’s vacation in Texas” in August of that same year. The strategy was to persuade the public and Congress that the United States and its allies should confront the “threat from Saddam Hussein.” The now infamous 9/11 anniversary speech — and the speech before the United Nations following the anniversary remarks — both stressed the importance of “[ridding] the world of terror.” But before speaking to the United Nations, Bush made the clearest case for war. Claiming “our principles and our security are challenged today by outlaw groups and regimes that accept no law of morality and have no limit to their violent ambitions,” Bush presented his case against Iraq, claiming Hussein had only “contempt for the United Nations … [claiming] it had no biological weapons. ” Making the case that Iraq had…

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Clinton Campaign Manager Deletes Tweets After FBI Announces New Probe

in Breaking News by

Moments after the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) announced it would reopen the probe into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private server while serving as the secretary of state under President Barack Obama, Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook deleted all of his tweets. An action that wasn’t ignored by WikiLeaks. The FBI’s decision to reopen the probe appears to follow the federal investigation into the electronic devices belonging to Anthony Weiner, the disgraced former member of the United States House of Representatives and his wife, Huma Abedin, a top aide to Mrs. Clinton. According to officials, a batch of emails that “appear to be pertinent” to the previous investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server has been reviewed, leading to the relaunch of the probe. “In connection with an unrelated case,” FBI director James Comey wrote in a letter sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee, “the FBI has learned of the existence of emails that appear to be pertinent to the investigation.” “I agreed that the FBI…

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Marco Rubio Warns Republicans About WikiLeaks: ‘Tomorrow, It Could Be Us’

in Breaking News/Politics by
Marco Rubio, wikileaks,

When Australian computer programmer, publisher, and journalist Julian Assange founded WikiLeaks in 2006, he wrote a piece titled “Conspiracy as Governance” in which he outlined his plan to target and destroy what he calls a true conspiracy: the political party. “Consider what would happen if one of these parties gave up their mobile phones, fax and email correspondence—let alone the computer systems which manage their [subscribers], donors, budgets, polling, call centres and direct mail campaigns,” Assange wrote in 2006. “They would immediately fall into an organisational stupor and lose to the other.” By fomenting the fear that communication tools are easy prey to hackers, he contended, politicians and their proxies would, over time, fear their correspondence could be leaked, “[inducing] fear and paranoia in its leadership and planning coterie.” At this stage, Assange explained, these same power players would have to face a “secrecy tax,” meaning the system’s efficiency would decline and powerful players would thus lose their “ability to hold onto power as the environment demands adaptation.” It…

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Glenn Beck: ‘I Know Why #BlackLivesMatter Matters’

in Politics by

During the 2016 RedState gathering in Denver, Colorado, radio host Glenn Beck gave an emotional speech touching on various subjects, from the Wounded Knee massacre to WWII female broadcaster Tokyo Rose. But when talking about the political movement known as Black Lives Matter, the conservative TV and radio personality stunned by claiming that he had finally learned why members of the movement were angry. In late 2015, Beck equated BLM to terrorism, saying “I think we need to start calling it that,” while adding that “[t]hey are terrorizing you.” But on August 12, 2016, Beck told an audience of enthusiastic conservatives, “I think I know why they are angry.” “I do not agree with Black Lives Matter. I do not agree with it,” said Beck. He justified his position by explaining, “[t]he leadership, they are communists.” But despite the group’s ideological component, Beck affirmed that their issue is legitimate and they are loud about it because “we’re not listening.” He continued: “We are not listening and they are not…

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