Check this out!

by / Culture

Less Snowflakes, More Grit

For the past several decades, within the dreary halls of every unionized public school in this country, a great fiction about our nation’s history has been spoonfed to the minds of the young and impressionable. They are programmed through a rigorous Prussian style system of repetition and regurgitation,  that what built this great country was not the ingenuity and ambition of great masters of industry and entrepreneurship, but rather a combination of some short lived and irrelevant union called “The Knights of Labor” and various federal government pork projects. The great American rag to riches histories of self-made men and business titans such as Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and Cornelius Vanderbilt, are belittled as nothing more than grand thieving robber barons who had to be put down and squashed by heroic Washington bureaucrats.

This juvenile folklore passing as historical fact would be almost laughable if not for how widespread the acceptance of this myth has become. The state school system fails in most regards, but it has quite the penchant for propagandizing and does a marvelous job at it. As a result of this misinformation, our nation has a collective ignorance of our own proud history and it has lead us astray not only politically, but more importantly culturally.

Culture is everything. Our founders crafted a beautiful and eloquent system of governance that guaranteed our freedoms and paved the way for us to be a prosperous and stable Republic for most of our history, but even they knew that it was never enough. At the end of the day, it is the gritty, hardworking, and individualistic spirit, one which is embodied in the American worker and entrepreneur, that is what truly kept this nation together. A healthy questioning of authority, an ambitious zeal to better oneself, a fear of God, and a love of family are the quintessential facets of traditional American culture. It is from those values and our embrace of capitalism that we have been able to achieve a level of prosperity and innovation that was never seen before in history.

Keep Reading

Today In History: Cicero Is Assassinated

in History/Philosophy by

December 7, 43 BC What does it take to be a philosopher-statesman? To dedicate one’s life to public service, to approach the issues of the day with a level head, to remain reasonable in the face of radicalism, and, above all, to carry your convictions through to their logical end, even if it costs your life? Marcus Tullius Cicero lived to see the greatest political moments in western history over the course of his 63-year life and his political, legal, and academic careers spanning nearly as long. But he didn’t just see it. He was an integral part of it. He served in the highest offices of the late Roman Republic, including the Consulate (chief executive) and the Senate, when he wasn’t finding spare time to translate into Latin, summarize, and write commentaries on the classic works of the Greek philosophers and craft a few philosophical tomes of his own. His writings on the Republic and the Laws remain to this day, in this author’s humble opinion, essential reading…

Keep Reading

Rep. Mulvaney: Say NO To Special Interest Giveaways In December Spending Bill

in Politics by
Rep. Mick Mulvaney

After spending tens of millions of dollars to elect a Republican Congress, Las Vegas casino titan Sheldon Adelson is looking for some payback. Sources on Capitol Hill fear that members of the House and Senate Republican leadership might be willing to throw the Tenth Amendment to the wayside and outlaw Adelson’s online competition as a way of saying thank you. Adelson, whose net worth has been estimated to be $33 billion, has waged a two-year jihad against New Jersey, Delaware and Nevada state laws that afford residents of those states to participate in online gambling. Rather than lobbying those states to repeal their laws, Adelson has turned to Washington to have those laws unconstitutionally overturned. Adelson’s lobbyist drafted legislation, often referred to as “RAWA” (Restore America’s Wire Act), which was quickly introduced by long-time Adelson ally Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC).  Adelson returned the favor by hosting a fundraiser for Graham’s ridiculous presidential campaign.   Although three congressional hearings were held to jump-start the legislation, the bill has failed to…

Keep Reading

Reforming The Electoral College Is Easier Than You Think

in Politics by

In a strangely fitting end to the 2016 election cycle, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote for president of the United States and lost the Electoral College, making her only the fifth candidate to have done so. Following the results, many people, including former Attorney General Eric Holder, have claimed that the Electoral College needs to be abolished. However, abolishing the Electoral College would stand against the principles upon which the United States was founded. Rather, there is a better way to ensure that the Electoral College still serves its intended purpose while simultaneously making it more representative of the electorate. The Electoral College was created to ensure that the number of voters in more populous states do not overwhelm those in more rural states. The total number of Electoral College votes are divided up among states based on the number of delegates each has in Congress, thus giving more weight to states that have higher populations (New York, Texas, Florida, and California, for example) while not completely excluding…

Keep Reading

Not a Sanctuary From Lies

in Culture/Politics by

Colleges have become notorious for being the “thought police” when it comes to different (usually conservative) opinions on their campuses. Safe spaces, post-election accommodations like getting to pet puppies and play with Play-Doh, and even organized walkouts and protests are just some examples of how schools are enabling this behavior. Additionally, many students (a majority of which most likely participated in those previously mentioned activities) on these campuses have called for their university to become a “sanctuary campus.” What students mean when they say they want a “sanctuary campus” is that they want their institution to operate similarly to that of a “sanctuary city.” This means that students do not want to allow the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) onto campus without a warrant or allow the school to share immigration status information with them, along with not allowing police to enforce immigration law. On top of this, there are even demands for providing special financial aid to students with DACA status. Washington State University in Pullman has been no…

Keep Reading

Total War: Fight Fire With Fire

in Culture/Politics by

The political left wins because it follows the tactic of total and continual war. It does not walk away from any election with the idea that combat can wait until the next election cycle. More importantly, they often make their biggest gains when out of power, precisely because they position themselves as “aggrieved” and “offended” and do not need to compromise to try to pass legislation. “Fake News” is just another one of their tactics. We are all talking about it now because the Left is very capable in defining the topics of the time, as a result of their near total control of academia, journalism and the media. Trump is also a master of defining the topics about which we discuss, but the question remains to what extent he will do so in a way that benefits conservatism generally.  Hopefully, with the addition of Breitbart’s media genius Stephen Bannon in his administration, he will be able to fight fire with fire.

Keep Reading

Work Force Participation Down Along With Unemployment

in Economics/Politics by

The latest jobs report is out for November 2016 and the media is in a frenzy over the fact that the unemployment rate has fallen to a nine year low at 4.6%. However, as anyone who has a passing familiarity with the voodoo science of statistics will tell you, numbers can be made to dance to any tune you wish and, contrary to popular opinion, they often lie. And while a 4.6% unemployment rate seems at face value to be great news for the economy, it is unwise to take anything from the government at face value and that holds doubly true for statistics. When you dig a little deeper into the actual numbers, though, a much more complex and much less vehemently optimistic picture of the US labor market emerges. For instance, the work for participation rate which gauges the overall percentage of the population that is actively engaged in the work force either through employment, the search for employment, or the application for unemployment benefits fell yet…

Keep Reading

Global Elite Prevails In Austria, Falls In Italy

in World by

A Populist candidate for President of Austria fell to an establishment-backed leftist, while the globalist Italian Prime Minister suffered a resounding defeat in his constitutional referendum and has announced his intent to resign from office. Nobert Hofer of the right-wing Freedom Party (FPÖ) conceded defeat to his opponent, former Greens Party leader Alexander Van der Bellen, after preliminary vote counts demonstrated higher-than-expected support for Van der Bellen. With roughly 99% of the vote tallied, Van der Bellen carried 53.3% compared to Hofer’s 46.7%. In the first round of voting held earlier this year, Nobert Hofer of the right-wing Freedom Party (FPÖ) defeated former Greens Party leader Alexander Van der Bellen. As neither candidate received more than 50%, a second round of voting was required. Van der Bellen was narrowly declared the winner in the second round after absentee ballots were counted.

Keep Reading

The Death Of Fidel Castro

in Politics/World by

Predictably, Oliver Stone and others on the Grassy Knoll left have lauded Fidel Castro in moist eulogies. For them, he brought a “glorious revolution” of literacy and impeccable health care to Cuba, and showed that communism could work if freed from the Russian model. On one hand, they assert that Castro never shied away from his Marxist intentions; on the other, they cannot transcend their “blame America first” mentality and assert that fanatical Cold Warriors such as Richard Nixon “pushed” Castro into the Soviet camp. Their theory asserts that far from being a communist, Castro was a democratic leader. Despite repeated assurances to the Eisenhower administration, Ike snobbishly snubbed the grubby revolutionary, authorizing Vice President Nixon to meet with Castro. After the meeting, Nixon declared Castro a communist. For Stone and company, this was not only a misperception, it was also the stuff of tragedy, for Nixon’s assessment kick started Operation Mongoose, a feverish assassination effort against Castro that would be continued even more obsessively by JFK.

Keep Reading

Help Wanted: Cultural Enrichment

in Politics by

Straddling the picturesque Dreisam River in the southeast German state of Baden-Württemberg is the small and quaint university city of Freiburg. On the night of October 16th, 19-year-old medical student Maria Ladenburger was brutally raped and drowned in the Dreisam River. After a thorough investigation, amid much public outcry, the suspect was determined to be a 17-year-old Afghan migrant who had entered Germany illegally and applied for asylum. Despite a previous record of assault, he was allowed to stay in the country. Local authorities are now investigating the similar rape and murder of a 27-year-old woman in the nearby town of Endingen. Both of these horrific cases are but just a small piece in a growing litany of tragedies that have been occurring across Europe in the wake of this unprecedented migrant crisis.

Keep Reading

What If Presidential Electors Are No Longer Bound?

in Philosophy/Politics by

The presidential election was a battle between populist emotion and a moderate establishment. While the pundits, journalists, and political elite all declared Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton had the election in the bag, this turned out not to be the case. And it wasn’t even close. Sort of. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, the bombastic businessman with a talent for upset, walked away with the electoral vote. He kicked down the doors at Democratic strongholds and knocked prediction models off their axis. Clinton supporters wept, Democrats were left speechless, and the pollsters defeated. How did this happen? At President Barack Obama’s urging, Clinton conceded defeat. The game was over.

Keep Reading

‘Economics Is Hard’: Groupthink Is Why We’re In Such Bad Shape

in Economics by
economics, hands, politics

In Principles of Economics, Carl Menger corrected the theoretical mistakes made by the old classical school. At the time, the founder of the Austrian School of economics seemed to want to make economics accessible to everyday people, which may explain why he exemplified the nature of economic value in his book, making sure readers understood that economics revolve around the actions of individuals. Described by many as “the best introduction to economic logic ever written,” Menger’s Principles inspired young economists like Ludwig von Mises to explore the populist nature of economics in an attempt to make the case that economics was for everyone, and that practical knowledge of economics can help even the most uneducated among us to prosper. Despite the honorable efforts and the exponential growth of influence the Austrian School of economics has exerted over the years, the reality is that, for most individuals around the globe, economics is hard.

Keep Reading

No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy

in Culture/Politics by

General James Mattis has been selected by President-elect Trump to succeed our country’s current Secretary of Defense, Ash Carter. The response to this choice has been almost universally praised as Mattis’ reputation for intelligence, innovation, and honor have preceded him since he first began his climb to prominence during the Persian Gulf War. He is not without his critics. There are those who believe in preserving a strict status of civilian control over the military, a policy and sentiment that are not without worth. Because of this tradition, there is a law in place which requires former military officers to have been retired from service for seven years before being eligible for the job.  For his nomination to be successful, Mattis would need congress to pass a special waiver allowing him to take the post. This is not without precedent; General Marshall was granted just such a waiver in 1950 before taking on the role of head of the Department of Defense. A solid red congress will more than…

Keep Reading

Tarzan – White Imperialist?

in Culture/Politics by

Although reviews of the new Tarzan film, The Legend of Tarzan, have been mixed, most have united around a single theme: that it is racist (one deemed it more racist than the infamous Birth of A Nation from 1915, which was sympathetic to the lynchings visited on blacks by the post Civil War Klan). Not to be outdone, Castro sympathizer Harry Belafonte has declared Tarzan to be the “most racist” character “in history.” Many have even questioned why anyone would make a film in the age of Obama about a character created in the “white man’s burden” atmosphere of 1912. The film-makers seem to have been concerned that Tarzan came from politically incorrect pro-imperialist source material, evidenced by the clunky insertion of Samuel L. Jackson as a Civil War veteran and doctor into the mix, and that of Christoph Walz as a sinister white imperialist bent on exploitation. But this has in no way satisfied the politically correct reviewers. They seem to have been most offended by Tarzan daring to…

Keep Reading

Trump’s Taiwan Call Exposes American Elite’s Affinity For China

in Politics by

All indications at this point seem to suggest that President Donald Trump is going to pull the rug out from beneath the norm. Regardless of what politicians he appoints to positions, his own actions will be what shakes the foundations of conventional thought. While many suspected this, the political elite has much to be concerned about at this point. The party just might be over. Recently, President-elect Donald Trump had a phone conversation with Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen. It was an innocent conversation of congratulations, a cordial exchange of pleasantries. Given our country’s supposed preference for democracy and diplomacy, this should be a welcome development. Pundits, politicians, and other members of the elite all responded with outrage. The problem with having a conversation with another country’s leader? Offending China.

Keep Reading

Senator Rand Paul Calls Out Pro-Petraeus Republicans On Their Hypocrisy

in Politics by

Though not as forward as his father, former Texas Congressman Ron Paul, Senator Rand Paul has carved out a reputation all his own. He surged into the United States Senate several years ago riding the Tea Party wave with a boost from his father’s libertarian base. In the years since, he has sought to accommodate the Republican establishment and ease his way into the party mainstream. It has been with mixed results. But one end result is in establishing his own commanding presence that Republicans across ideological divides listen to. The trend among partisan politics in America politics shows parties cowering when their own party abuses power while sounding the alarm when the other side does it. The recently re-elected Kentucky Senator has signaled he will not be backing down, even with a Republican in control of the White House.

Keep Reading

Why Pardoning Edward Snowden Is Important To American History

in History/Politics by

Over the last several years, the debate over whistleblowers in society has intensified. Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden currently lives in exile, unable to return home because of what he leaked. While in all technicality he did break the law, sometimes morality is greater than legality. The programs he exposed confirmed the suspicions of many and painted a more vivid picture of the nightmares we long imagined. We are being watched like criminals without a criminal conviction, our data is being intercepted as if we’re terrorists without committing a terrorist act, and all of this information is being stored without any legal authorization.

Keep Reading

Still Cold

in History by

In a 1993 foreword to his classic, The Spy Who Came In From the Cold (1963), Le Carree, who, in his role as an agent for the Secret Intelligence Service was stationed in Berlin when the Wall went up, declared it a symbol of “an ideology gone mad,” guarded by “brainwashed little thugs.” For those who knew of his works, this was startling, for his metier had always been the moral equivalence between the Soviet Union and Great Britain.

Keep Reading

Trump’s Deal Cutting Just Won’t Cut It

in Economics/Politics by

Last week, President-elect Donald J. Trump and his administration reached a deal with United Technologies, holding company of the air conditioner and appliance manufacturer Carrier, to keep around 1,000 jobs in the United States. Trump has promised on the campaign trail that he would keep those jobs on US soil since Carrier first announced that they would move their manufacturing from Indiana to Mexico in February. Outlets from Breitbart to The Young Turks have praised the deal. What a great power move! Trump isn’t even in office yet, and he’s already closing deals. But what if Trump’s latest deal is filling the swamp rather than draining it? Carrier’s decision was purportedly based on tax breaks promised by Indiana Governor and Vice President-elect Mike Pence in conjunction with Trump’s planned pro-business policies. There’s an issue with that narrative, however. The total in tax breaks is $7 million. The cost to keep those jobs in the States: $65 million. The incentives were offered months ago and subsequently declined by Carrier, so it’s…

Keep Reading

Manchuria Revisited

in History by

When Richard Condon, a former publicist for Walt Disney, sought a theme to unsettle late 50s America, arguably the calmest period of the Cold War, he didn’t resort to nuclear war. Instead, he backtracked to the early 1950s, when every headline showed the exposure of one more Soviet Spy in the halls of power. This formidable fear competed with brainwashing, a technique pioneered by the Chinese during the Korean War. While the communist-in-government theme disturbed America and led many to support the housecleaning Joseph McCarthy promised, it posed the same terror as brainwashing. The notion of working America that treachery was exclusive to Ivy League elitists like Alger Hiss was dispelled when they saw melting pot American soldier spouting anti-American rhetoric while surrounded by their Chinese guards. No longer could the patriotism of the ordinary joe be considered impervious to the fiendish Yellow Peril that Americans thought had been destroyed in 1945. Alone, these fears were cringeworthy. But Condon conjoined them, while at the same time making a powerful…

Keep Reading

Why You Should Support A Ban On Late-Term Abortions

in Law/Philosophy by

The ongoing debate on abortion is one of the most divisive issues in the political sphere, and it has attracted increased attention over this election cycle. It has become a more pressing issue as the public is uncertain about how abortion rights will change when President-elect Trump takes office. His presidency is expected to usher in a more conservative stance on abortion, as shown by Vice President-elect Pence’s pro-life position and Trump’s promise that “the justices that I am going to appoint will be pro-life.” The public is aware of the gravity of this matter, as 45% of Americans stated that it is important to them that future Supreme Court nominees share their views on abortion. The pro-choice vs. pro-life divide continues to deepen as each side resists compromise, fearing that their opposition will take advantage of any settlement. While many people have become absorbed in abortion as a political issue, they forget about the moral underpinnings that make it such a factious topic. This disparity can be seen in…

Keep Reading

McCarthy And His Enemies

in History by

Even in 1954, it took quite a bit of courage to write a book supporting Senator Joe McCarthy’s investigations into communist infiltration of the American government. Although the common people (later called the “silent majority”) supported him, the intellectual class did not. Dwight MacDonald called him “the most dangerous demogague” in the United States. Former Presidential Candidate Adlai Stevenson called the Senator’s crusade a “reign of terror.” President Truman compared him to a politician doing the work of the Kremlin (this perception would help kick-start Richard Condon’s The Manchurian Candidate). Even conservatives like Whittaker Chambers called the Senator “a raven of disaster.” When McCarthy and his Enemies appeared it was tarred with the same brush used against the Senator. Dwight MacDonald likened the authors’ rationalizations of McCarthy’s behavior to how fellow travelers in the 30s glossed over Stalinist brutality. Even using the book as a favorable source today earns an onslaught. Ann Coulter, Arthur Herrman, and Stanford Evans, capitazing on de-classified documents showing Alger Hiss and Julius Rosenberg were…

Keep Reading

A Cash Crop To Rebuild America: The Cannabis Revolution Means Better Public Health And Limitless Prosperity

in Culture/Economics/Politics by

Whether you like it or not, the cannabis revolution is underway throughout America. Four states have already legalized marijuana for recreational purposes, and four more states are slated to join them after the results of last month’s election. On Nov. 8, the big winner wasn’t Donald Trump – it was the cannabis plant. It reigned triumphant in Florida, North Dakota, Arkansas, California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada in varying degrees. Of course, the prohibitionists are out in full force with a propaganda blitz of their own against the progress being made. Some warn of “killer weed” while other desperate individuals say that marijuana “changes the brain” causing mass murderers to snap and commit acts of terror. Many of these disingenuous folks are lobbyists for pharmaceutical corporations or law enforcement groups. They lie to the public because they don’t want their gravy train drying up. Nevertheless, the winds of change are at hand whether the prohibitionists like it or not. The marijuana industry is opening up an era of prosperity that…

Keep Reading

House GOP’s Plan To Flesh Out Trump Agenda

in Politics by

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has long staked his claim in Washington as a top-tier policy wonk. The young Congressman, driven to public service by conservative giants like Jack Kemp, would have never expected to be Speaker. He got his start pushing his visionary, albeit outside of the time’s mainstream, budget proposals. At the time, the two major parties’ only difference on fiscal policy was whether we ought to go over the cliff at 70 miles per hour rather than 80. The Referendum Party The political debate was fundamentally transformed by the election of a charismatic, ideological progressive President. In the wake of an economic meltdown, conservative Republicans finally found their voice. They stood in opposition to overreach, first by President Bush and then by President Obama. The newly elected President’s left-wing agenda consisted of a bloated, poorly engineered stimulus, an onslaught of new regulations for American companies to follow, and a large expansion of already-expansive government power in the healthcare system. Conservative Republicans had a perfect foil. In…

Keep Reading

The Cohn-Schine Pratfalls

in History by

An oft-repeated phrase by liberal anticommunists about Joseph McCarthy, that he may as well have been a KGB agent for all the damage he did to the anticommunist cause, inspired Richard Condon to write his Cold War masterpiece, The Manchurian Candidate, a tale of a Soviet sleeper agent directing her brainless headline-grabbing senator husband to destroy Cold War alliances and thus allow a communist takeover of the country. But McCarthy, for all his inability to substantiate any of his charges–a factor that exasperated defenders like William F. Buckley and repelled conservative heavyweights like Whittaker Chambers from supporting him (Chambers would characterize the senator as “a raven of disasater”)–did not fit the role of Condon’s crocodile-like wife. That honor belongs to Roy Marcus Cohn, added to McCarthy’s staff sixty years ago. Ironically, McCarthy hired this son of a liberal Jewish judge to offset any charges of antisemitism, but it would be Cohn, not other staff member Bobby Kennedy, the son of the Hitler-appeasing Joe, who would make even more credible…

Keep Reading

A War Not Lost: The Conservative Plan To Defeat Poverty

in Culture/Economics by

In his far-reaching effort, known as “A Better Way”, to define a coherent, conservative legislative agenda, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan brought together the talent and put in the time to chart a path forward in the War on Poverty. For too long, conservatives have allowed the War on Poverty to be waged by leftists, bureaucracy, and those whose favorite part of the Constitution is the taxing and spending clause. The product of these misguided technocrats couldn’t signal a more resounding defeat. They’ve waged a battle in which success was measured by inputs rather than outcomes. Rather than focusing on helping people, they’ve chosen to pride themselves on the financial commitment, upwards a trillion dollars, that they’ve made to do so. When you take a step back from the trench warfare of politicized headlines and poll-tested talking points, conservative principles provide the ideal framework for combating poverty and lifting people up. American conservatism is built on the belief that every person is granted inalienable rights from God, a…

Keep Reading

Trans Pacific Partnership Is About Control, Not Free Trade

in Economics by

The latest “free trade” agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), is lurking behind the headlines. Congress is poised to renew trade promotion authority (TPA), also known as “fast track” negotiating authority, which will make the ratification of the TPP more likely, just as happened previously with NAFTA and other so-called free trade agreements. This is not a good thing. Those in favor of free enterprise, free trade, capitalism, and private property rights should oppose the TPP and the fast-track authority that makes its passage more likely. Let me explain why. The details of the TPP are obscure, as it is being negotiated in secret, and its provisions are arcane. For this reason, the average citizen is uninterested in or knows little about this measure. Those in favor of free trade assume it’s a positive measure, but they don’t know much about it. Moreover, both left and right are wrong about the TPP. The left is opposing the TPP for the wrong reasons, and the right and corporate interests (allied with Obama) are using disingenuous arguments…

Keep Reading

What Would Ludwig Von Mises Do In Venezuela?

in Economics by

The crisis in Venezuela is the most modern illustration of the horrific consequences of socialism and the devastating reality of hyperinflation. What makes this disaster all the more infuriating is that it could have been avoided with a basic understanding of history. We’ve seen the disaster of socialism and interventionism in various forms play out across the world time and time again with similar results, and yet new generations of central planners — backed by ideologically aligned intellectuals — are consistently able to fool people into believing that “this time will be different.” Ludwig von Mises himself lived through one of these historical episodes. Following defeat in World War I, the Austro-Hungarian Empire was in a state of crisis. The Habsburg monarchy ended in 1918 and with it came the dissolution of the Empire. The German-speaking population formed what we now know as Austria, and the nation soon faced a severe economic crisis. The government, led by a coalition of Social Democrats, Christian Socialists, and a Nationalist Party, implemented…

Keep Reading

The Death Of Definition: How 2016 Reset America’s Political Spectrum

in Culture/Politics by

Among the many time-honored structures left in ruins by the 2016 presidential process, perhaps nothing has suffered more than our comfortable set of political labels. Terms like “conservative”, “progressive”, “liberal”, “libertarian”, and even “classic liberal” (courtesy, Speaker Paul Ryan) have been growing dull for years, but this year seems to have become so useless that warring activists under each label were forced to drop their weapons, crawl out of their respective trenches, scratch their heads, and try to figure out which side they really belonged on. Who can blame them? Every election has its share of word-bending, but 2016 dropkicked our traditional categories completely by nominating two remarkably similar New York moderates claiming to represent opposite sides of the political spectrum.

Keep Reading

Zoning: A Tragic Public Policy

in Economics by

In the view of most concerned professionals, zoning legislation is a necessary bulwark against chaos in urban land use. Without zoning, it is contended, external diseconomies will abound: pickle works will come to rest next to single family homes, glue factories beside country clubs, and oil refineries in proximity to restaurants. Moreover, it is feared that rapacious land developers will erect, profit from, and then abandon buildings, placing undue strain on the capacities of municipal services. Further, the unzoned city will be one of haphazard construction, falling property values, instability, disregard for neighborhood “character,” irrational allocation of property—and a haven for unscrupulous speculators. Zoning is the attempt to suppress these supposed market defects by legislatively prohibiting incompatible uses of land. Under this ordinance, the pickle factory would be prohibited from residential neighborhoods and required to locate itself in a special industrial area, reserved for that kind of operation. There, surrounded by similar uses, it would presumably do little harm. The zoning idea has a certain appeal. What, after all,…

Keep Reading

In Defense Of Trump’s Deal With Carrier

in Economics/Politics by

Donald Trump hasn’t yet made the move from Trump Tower to America’s most expensive public housing, but he was able to come through with one campaign promise this week by announcing a deal with Indiana-based Carrier Air Conditioning that will keep almost 1,000 jobs in the state. As reported, the deal seems largely focused on the State of Indiana offering millions in tax breaks and an understanding that the Trump administration will push for regulatory and corporate tax relief at the Federal level. While the jobs Carrier will be keeping in the US only makes up about a third of the jobs the company had planned to move to Mexico, the underlying deal seems to reflect a larger commitment to addressing the corporate tax and regulatory burdens that have long held back the American economy. While some have described Trump’s approach as crony capitalism, if the terms of the deal really are limited to tax relief, such claims are baseless. While it is true that tax breaks for specific companies are less ideal…

Keep Reading

The Jeffersonian Secessionist Tradition

in History/Politics by

Thomas Jefferson, the author of America’s July 4, 1776 Declaration of Secession from the British empire, was a lifelong advocate of both the voluntary union of the free, independent, and sovereign states, and of the right of secession. “If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form,” he said in his first inaugural address in 1801, “let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left to combat it.” In a January 29, 1804 letter to Dr. Joseph Priestley, who had asked Jefferson his opinion of the New England secession movement that was gaining momentum, he wrote: “Whether we remain in one confederacy, or form into Atlantic and Mississippi confederacies, I believe not very important to the happiness of either part. Those of the western confederacy will be as much our children & descendants as those of the eastern . . . and did I now foresee a…

Keep Reading

A Return To Liberal Learning: The Examined Life IS Worth Living

in Philosophy by

Not all news coming from academia these days is necessarily bad news. In my own little corner of this world, some of it is actually quite good, and it’s all that much sweeter when it is considered within the larger context of contemporary events. At a time when universities and colleges around the country are creating “safe spaces,” hosting “cry ins” and “walk outs,” and distributing coloring books and the like for students and faculty who have been traumatized by the election of Donald J. Trump to the presidency; when institutions of higher learning have betrayed their traditional mission by substituting training in political ideology for education of the heads and hearts of their pupils—I’m happy to report that the members of the community of my little college in Southern New Jersey are busy attending to the sorts of matters for the sake of which the liberal arts had historically been prized.

Keep Reading

“Buy America” Legislation Is The Wrong Way To Put America First

in Economics/Politics by

A large part of Donald Trump’s stunning upset against Hillary Clinton was the rise of the working class American who has long been left behind by the political elite. Overbearing regulations and high taxation drive good jobs out of the country, where businesses can get the job done for cheaper. Now that the controversial Republican businessman has gone from longshot to President-elect, expect more discussion regarding stopping the outsourcing of jobs and bringing work back home. “Buy America” legislation is again front and center in Congress. Although Republicans often adopt the America First rhetoric, it is the Democrats who are pushing the legislation to force businesses to prefer American products versus foreign-made products. Is this a moment of hypocrisy for the Republican Party as it rides in on an America First wave?

Keep Reading

1 2 3 23
Go to Top

Thanks for visiting our site! Stay in touch with us by subscribing to our newsletter. You will receive all of our latest updates, articles, endorsements, interviews, and videos direct to your inbox. 

Send this to friend